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Macroeconomic Effects of Inflation Target Uncertainty Shocks

Author

Listed:
  • Marcelo Arbex

    () (Department of Economics, University of Windsor)

  • Sidney Caetano

    () (Department of Economics, Federal University of Juiz de Fora)

  • Wilson Correa

    () (Department of Economics, Federal University of Juiz de Fora)

Abstract

This note studies the macroeconomic effects of uncertainty shocks on the inflation target (IT). The IT is assumed to change over time and its stochastic volatility is modeled as an autoregressive process. We show that an IT uncertainty shock, namely a shock on its volatility) resembles an aggregate demand shock, a robust qualitative result for different Taylor-type rules. The magnitude of real and nominal variables responses depend crucially on the Taylor rule considered: a more reactive rule implies a less severe recession and deflation, while an empirical plausible degree of interest rate smoothing leads output, unemployment, and inflation to react more strongly causing the recession to be more severe and deflationary.

Suggested Citation

  • Marcelo Arbex & Sidney Caetano & Wilson Correa, 2018. "Macroeconomic Effects of Inflation Target Uncertainty Shocks," Working Papers 1804, University of Windsor, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:wis:wpaper:1804
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Oleg S. Sukharev, 2020. "Inflation control and adequacy of targeting to economic growth policy," Upravlenets, Ural State University of Economics, vol. 11(1), pages 33-44, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Uncertainty shocks; Infl ation target; Monetary policy.;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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