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Global Value Chains in Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Foster-McGregor, Neil

    (UNU-MERIT)

  • Kaulich, Florian
  • Stehrer, Robert

Abstract

This paper provides evidence on the extent of Global Value Chain (GVC) participation by Africa as a region and for individual African countries. We find that Africa as a whole is heavily involved in GVCs, being more engaged in GVCs than many developing country regions as well as developed countries such as the USA. This overall finding hides the fact that much of Africa's participation in GVCs is in upstream production, with African firms providing primary inputs to firms in countries further down the value chain. The possibility of upgrading within GVCs in Africa is likely to be limited therefore, something which the current analysis suggests. Despite this, we observe a great deal of heterogeneity in terms of GVC participation and upgrading across African countries, with a number of African countries participating in GVCs to a relatively large extent.

Suggested Citation

  • Foster-McGregor, Neil & Kaulich, Florian & Stehrer, Robert, 2015. "Global Value Chains in Africa," MERIT Working Papers 024, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:unumer:2015024
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    File URL: https://www.merit.unu.edu/publications/wppdf/2015/wp2015-024.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jean Balié & Davide Del Prete & Emiliano Magrini & Pierluigi Montalbano & Silvia Nenci, 2017. "Agriculture and Food Global Value Chains in Sub-Saharan Africa: Does bilateral trade policy impact on backward and forward participation?," Working Papers 4/17, Sapienza University of Rome, DISS.
    2. Fagerberg, Jan & Lundvall, Bengt-Åke & Srholec, Martin, 2017. "Global value chains, national innovation systems and economic development," Papers in Innovation Studies 2017/15, Lund University, CIRCLE - Center for Innovation, Research and Competences in the Learning Economy.
    3. repec:spr:weltar:v:153:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10290-017-0292-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Davide Del Prete & Giorgia Giovannetti & Enrico Marvasi, 2017. "Global value chains participation and productivity gains for North African firms," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 153(4), pages 675-701, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Africa; Global Value Chains; GVC; Upgrading;

    JEL classification:

    • D46 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Value Theory
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • O25 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Industrial Policy

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