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Give Credit where Credit is Due: Tracing Value Added in Global Production Chains

Author

Listed:
  • Robert Koopman

    (United States International Trade Commission)

  • William Powers

    (United States International Trade Commission)

  • Zhi Wang

    (United States International Trade Commission)

  • Shang-Jin Wei

    (Columbia University and Centre for Economic Policy Research and National Bureau of Economic Research and Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research)

Abstract

This paper presents a new conceptual framework to measure sources of value-added trade by country in global production networks. With a parsimonious decomposition of gross exports that eliminates "double counting", it integrates all previous measures of vertical specialization and value-added trade in the literature. We apply the framework to the most recent appropriate data (2004). Among emerging markets, East Asian countries are the most globally integrated. Among major developed economies, the US is the most integrated in some aspects, and Japan in others. These regional differences also affect exporters¡¦ trade costs.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Koopman & William Powers & Zhi Wang & Shang-Jin Wei, 2011. "Give Credit where Credit is Due: Tracing Value Added in Global Production Chains," Working Papers 312011, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:hkm:wpaper:312011
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Guillaume Daudin & Christine Rifflart & Danielle Schweisguth, 2011. "Who produces for whom in the world economy?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 44(4), pages 1403-1437, November.
    2. Richard E. Baldwin, 2008. "Managing The Noodle Bowl: The Fragility Of East Asian Regionalism," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 53(03), pages 449-478.
    3. Dean, Judith & Fung, K.C. & Wang, Zhi, 2008. "How vertically specialized is Chinese trade?," BOFIT Discussion Papers 31/2008, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    4. Robert Koopman & Zhi Wang & Shang-Jin Wei, 2008. "How Much of Chinese Exports is Really Made In China? Assessing Domestic Value-Added When Processing Trade is Pervasive," NBER Working Papers 14109, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Athukorala, Prema-chandra & Yamashita, Nobuaki, 2006. "Production fragmentation and trade integration: East Asia in a global context," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 233-256, December.
    6. Kei-Mu Yi, 2003. "Can Vertical Specialization Explain the Growth of World Trade?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, pages 52-102.
    7. Biswajit Nag & Saikat Banerjee & Rittwik Chatterjee, 2007. "Changing Features of the Automobile Industry in Asia:Comparison of Production, Trade and Market Structure in Selected Countries," Working Papers 3707, Asia-Pacific Research and Training Network on Trade (ARTNeT), an initiative of UNESCAP and IDRC, Canada..
    8. Kei-Mu Yi, 2010. "Can Multistage Production Explain the Home Bias in Trade?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(1), pages 364-393, March.
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    11. Koopman, Robert & Wang, Zhi & Wei, Shang-Jin, 2009. "A World Factory in Global Production Chains: Estimating Imported Value Added in Chinese Exports," CEPR Discussion Papers 7430, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Maurer, Andreas & Degain, Christophe, 2010. "Globalization and trade flows: What you see is not what you get!," WTO Staff Working Papers ERSD-2010-12, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.
    13. Robert C. Feenstra & Robert E. Lipsey & Lee G. Branstetter & C. Fritz Foley & James Harrigan & J. Bradford Jensen & Lori Kletzer & Catherine Mann & Peter K. Schott & Greg C. Wright, 2010. "Report on the State of Available Data for the Study of International Trade and Foreign Direct Investment," NBER Working Papers 16254, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Peltonen, Tuomas & Pula, Gabor, 2009. "Has emerging Asia decoupled? An analysis of production and trade linkages using the Asian international input-output table," Working Paper Series 993, European Central Bank.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F1 - International Economics - - Trade
    • F2 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business

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