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Trade Integration, Global Value Chains, and Capital Accumulation

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Listed:
  • Michael Sposi
  • Kei-Mu Yi
  • Jing Zhang

Abstract

Motivated by increasing trade and fragmentation of production across countries, accompanied by income convergence by many emerging economies, we build a dynamic two-country model featuring sequential, multi-stage production and capital accumulation. As trade costs decline over time, global-value-chain (GVC) trade expands across countries, particularly more in the faster growing country, consistent with the empirical pattern. Via Heckscher-Ohlin forces, GVC trade can generate back-and-forth feedback between comparative advantage and capital accumulation (growth). Moreover, GVC trade increases both steady-state and dynamic gains from trade.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Sposi & Kei-Mu Yi & Jing Zhang, 2020. "Trade Integration, Global Value Chains, and Capital Accumulation," NBER Working Papers 28087, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:28087
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity

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