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Industrial Diversity, Trade Patterns, and Productivity Convergence

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  • Robert Stehrer
  • Julia Woerz

Abstract

Recent developments in economic integration show rather diverse patterns of integration in the world economy. Some countries remain predominantly in the low-tech industries whereas other countries succeed in becoming competitive in high-tech industries as well. The authors postulate that a country positioning itself at the lower end of the spectrum of high-tech industries is more favorable to its long-term development than aiming at the upper end of low-tech industries. They argue that countries which specialize in the lower end of the medium-high-tech activities are rewarded by faster productivity increases also in the upper end of the high-tech industries. In contrast, early specialization in medium-low-tech branches yields positive spillovers, mainly in the low-tech sector, which is not conducive to increasing activity in high-tech industries. The authors sketch a theoretical outline of this idea and present econometric results, including four aggregate manufacturing branches across 37 countries. Copyright © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Stehrer & Julia Woerz, 2009. "Industrial Diversity, Trade Patterns, and Productivity Convergence," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(2), pages 356-372, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:13:y:2009:i:2:p:356-372
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alessia Amighini, 2005. "China in the international fragmentation of production: Evidence from the ICT industry," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 2(2), pages 203-219, December.
    2. Julia Wörz, 2005. "Skill Intensity in Foreign Trade and Economic Growth," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 32(1), pages 117-144, March.
    3. Alessandrini, Michele & Fattouh, Bassam & Ferrarini, Benno & Scaramozzino, Pasquale, 2011. "Tariff liberalization and trade specialization: Lessons from India," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(4), pages 499-513.
    4. Foster-McGregor, Neil & Kaulich, Florian & Stehrer, Robert, 2015. "Global Value Chains in Africa," MERIT Working Papers 024, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • L6 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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