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Microcredit and Women’s Empowerment: Through the Lens of Time Use Data from Rural India

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  • Supriya Garikipati

Abstract

This study examines the impact of microcredit on male and female time use and draws on this analysis to explore the linkages between credit and women’s empowerment. A study of time use can help understand these linkages because credit targeted at women with the intent of influencing their livelihoods must also influence the way they allocate their work time. Its other advantages are that it does not suffer from much time lag and can be objectively measured. We use survey data from rural India. Our findings show that while microcredit has little impact on women’s time use, it helps their husbands shift away from wage-work, which is associated with bad pay and low status, to self-employment. We find that this is because women’s loans are typically used to enhance male ownership of household’s productive assets. Further, we find that only women who use loans in self-managed enterprises are able to allocate more time to self-employment. We conclude that if credit is to increase the value of women’s work time then it is not access to loan but use of loan that matters. Specifically, women’s control over loan created assets is critical.

Suggested Citation

  • Supriya Garikipati, 2011. "Microcredit and Women’s Empowerment: Through the Lens of Time Use Data from Rural India," Working Papers CEB 11-034, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  • Handle: RePEc:sol:wpaper:2013/96915
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Garikipati, Supriya, 2008. "The Impact of Lending to Women on Household Vulnerability and Women's Empowerment: Evidence from India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(12), pages 2620-2642, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Supriya Garikipati & Susan Johnson & Isabelle Guérin & Ariane Szafarz, 2017. "Microfinance and Gender: Issues, Challenges and The Road Ahead," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(5), pages 641-648, May.
    2. Kamel Bel hadj Miled & Jalel-Eddine Ben Rejeb, 2018. "Can Microfinance Help to Reduce Poverty? A Review of Evidence for Developing Countries," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 9(2), pages 613-635, June.
    3. Roy, Chandan & Chatterjee, Susmita & Dutta Gupta, Sangita, 2017. "Women Empowerment Index: Construction of a Tool to Measure Rural Women Empowerment Level in India," MPRA Paper 92796, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. David Mark Dror, 2018. "Enrollment in Community-based Health Insurance Schemes in Rural Bihar and Uttar Pradesh, India," World Scientific Book Chapters, in: Financing Micro Health Insurance Theory, Methods and Evidence, chapter 17, pages 345-363, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    5. World Bank, 2014. "India : Women, Work and Employment," World Bank Publications - Reports 18737, The World Bank Group.
    6. Olga Gorelkina & Ioanna Grypari & Erin Hengel, 2019. "One strike and you’re out! The Master Lever’s effect on senatorial policy-making," Working Papers 201906, University of Liverpool, Department of Economics.
    7. Mansour Esmaeil Zaei & Prachi Kapil & Olha Pelekh & Azadeh Teimoury Nasab, 2018. "Does Micro-Credit Empower Women through Self-Help Groups? Evidence from Punjab, Northern India," Societies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(3), pages 1-15, July.
    8. Supriya Garikipati & Rebecca J. Docherty & Penelope A. Phillips-Howard, 2019. "What’s the bleeding problem? Policy and attitudes towards sustainable menstrual hygiene materials in India," Working Papers 201907, University of Liverpool, Department of Economics.
    9. Ranjula Bali Swain & Supriya Garikipati, 2019. "Microfinance in the Global South: Examining Evidence on Social Efficacy," Working Papers 201908, University of Liverpool, Department of Economics.

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