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New Evidence on Linear Regression and Treatment Effect Heterogeneity

  • Słoczyński, Tymon

In this paper I provide new evidence on the implications of treatment effect heterogeneity for least squares estimation when the effects are inappropriately assumed to be homogenous. I prove that under a set of benchmark assumptions linear regression provides a consistent estimator of the population average treatment effect on the treated times the population proportion of the nontreated individuals plus the population average treatment effect on the nontreated times the population proportion of the treated individuals. Consequently, in many empirical applications the linear regression estimates might not be close to any of the standard average treatment effects of interest.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/39524/1/MPRA_paper_39524.pdf
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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/60810/8/MPRA_paper_60810.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 39524.

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Date of creation: 27 Jun 2012
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:39524
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  1. Frölich, Markus & Melly, Blaise, 2008. "Unconditional Quantile Treatment Effects under Endogeneity," IZA Discussion Papers 3288, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Nicole Fortin & Thomas Lemieux & Sergio Firpo, 2010. "Decomposition Methods in Economics," NBER Working Papers 16045, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Sergio Firpo, 2007. "Efficient Semiparametric Estimation of Quantile Treatment Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 75(1), pages 259-276, 01.
  4. Mitnik, Oscar K. & Imbens, Guido & Hotz, V. Joseph & Crump, Richard K., 2008. "Nonparametric Tests for Treatment Effect Heterogeneity," Scholarly Articles 3039049, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  5. Løken, Katrine Vellesen & Mogstad, Magne & Wiswall, Matthew, 2011. "What Linear Estimators Miss: The E ects of Family Income on Child Outcomes," Working Papers in Economics 02/11, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
  6. Roland G. Fryer & Steven D. Levitt, 2004. "Understanding the Black-White Test Score Gap in the First Two Years of School," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(2), pages 447-464, May.
  7. Richard Blundell & Monica Costa Dias, 2009. "Alternative Approaches to Evaluation in Empirical Microeconomics," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(3).
  8. Keisuke Hirano & Guido W. Imbens & Geert Ridder, 2000. "Efficient Estimation of Average Treatment Effects Using the Estimated Propensity Score," NBER Technical Working Papers 0251, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Djebbari, Habiba & Smith, Jeffrey, 2008. "Heterogeneous impacts in PROGRESA," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 145(1-2), pages 64-80, July.
  10. Barsky R. & Bound J. & Charles K.K. & Lupton J.P., 2002. "Accounting for the Black-White Wealth Gap: A Nonparametric Approach," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 97, pages 663-673, September.
  11. James J. Heckman, 2001. "Micro Data, Heterogeneity, and the Evaluation of Public Policy: Nobel Lecture," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 109(4), pages 673-748, August.
  12. Ben Jann, 2008. "The Blinder–Oaxaca decomposition for linear regression models," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 8(4), pages 453-479, December.
  13. Marianne Bitler & Jonah Gelbach & Hilary Hoynes, 2003. "What Mean Impacts Miss: Distributional Effects of Welfare Reform Experiments," NBER Working Papers 10121, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Joshua D. Angrist, 1995. "Estimating the Labor Market Impact of Voluntary Military Service Using Social Security Data on Military Applicants," NBER Working Papers 5192, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. LaLonde, Robert J, 1986. "Evaluating the Econometric Evaluations of Training Programs with Experimental Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(4), pages 604-20, September.
  16. Dan A. Black & Jeffrey A. Smith & Mark C. Berger & Brett J. Noel, 2003. "Is the Threat of Reemployment Services More Effective Than the Services Themselves? Evidence from Random Assignment in the UI System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1313-1327, September.
  17. Patrick Kline, 2011. "Oaxaca-Blinder as a Reweighting Estimator," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(3), pages 532-37, May.
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