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Global Engagement and Returns Volatility

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  • Sourafel Girma
  • Sandra Lancheros
  • Alejandro Riano

Abstract

This paper uses high-frequency data for publicly-listed Japanese manufacturing firms over the period 2000 to 2010 to show that a greater reliance on foreign market sales increases the conditional volatility of firms’ stock returns. The two margins of global engagement we consider, namely, exports and sales via foreign affiliates, have both a positive and economically significant effect on firm-level volatility, although an increase in the intensity of sales through foreign affiliates has a stronger effect on volatility than a similar change in firms’ export intensity. We also uncover evidence consistent with the notion that firms’ need to use external finance to cover the substantial costs involved in reaching foreign consumers is an important channel through which firms’ participation in international markets increases their exposure to economic uncertainty.

Suggested Citation

  • Sourafel Girma & Sandra Lancheros & Alejandro Riano, 2015. "Global Engagement and Returns Volatility," Discussion Papers 2015/12, University of Nottingham, Centre for Finance, Credit and Macroeconomics (CFCM).
  • Handle: RePEc:not:notcfc:15/12
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    1. repec:spr:weltar:v:154:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s10290-018-0312-x is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Urška Čede & Bogdan Chiriacescu & Péter Harasztosi & Tibor Lalinsky & Jaanika Meriküll, 2018. "Export characteristics and output volatility: comparative firm-level evidence for CEE countries," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 154(2), pages 347-376, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Volatility; Stock Returns; Exports; FDI; External Finance Dependence; Japan;

    JEL classification:

    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)

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