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What Drove the Increase in Idiosyncratic Volatility during the Internet Boom?

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  • Fink, Jason
  • Fink, Kristin E.
  • Grullon, Gustavo
  • Weston, James P.

Abstract

Aggregate idiosyncratic volatility spiked nearly fivefold during the Internet boom of the late 1990s, dwarfing in magnitude a moderately increasing trend. While some researchers argue that this rise in idiosyncratic risk was the result of changes in the characteristics of public firms, others argue that it was driven by the changing sentiment of irrational traders. We present evidence that the marketwide decline in maturity of the typical public firm can explain most of the increase in firm-specific risk during the Internet boom. Controlling for firm maturity, we find no evidence that investor sentiment drives idiosyncratic risk throughout the Internet boom.

Suggested Citation

  • Fink, Jason & Fink, Kristin E. & Grullon, Gustavo & Weston, James P., 2010. "What Drove the Increase in Idiosyncratic Volatility during the Internet Boom?," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 45(05), pages 1253-1278, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jfinqa:v:45:y:2010:i:05:p:1253-1278_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Kryzanowski, Lawrence & Mohsni, Sana, 2015. "Earnings forecasts and idiosyncratic volatilities," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 107-123.
    2. Sourafel Girma & Sandra Lancheros & Alejandro Riaño, 2016. "Global Engagement and Returns Volatility," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 78(6), pages 814-833, December.
    3. Ferris, Erin E. Syron, 2015. "Dividend Taxes and Stock Volatility," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2015-36, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    4. repec:eee:revfin:v:35:y:2017:i:c:p:11-28 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Hasan, Mostafa Monzur & Habib, Ahsan, 2017. "Firm life cycle and idiosyncratic volatility," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 164-175.
    6. Huang, Chia-Wei & Ho, Po-Hsin & Lin, Chih-Yung & Yen, Ju-Fang, 2014. "Firm age, idiosyncratic risk, and long-run SEO underperformance," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 246-266.
    7. Emmanuel De Veirman & Andrew T. Levin, 2011. "Cyclical Changes in Firm Volatility," CAMA Working Papers 2011-29, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    8. Loderer, Claudio F. & Stulz, Rene M. & Waelchli, Urs, 2013. "Limited Managerial Attention and Corporate Aging," Working Paper Series 2013-13, Ohio State University, Charles A. Dice Center for Research in Financial Economics.
    9. Bekaert, Geert & Hodrick, Robert J. & Zhang, Xiaoyan, 2012. "Aggregate Idiosyncratic Volatility," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 47(06), pages 1155-1185, December.
    10. Tan, Pei P. & Galagedera, Don U.A. & Maharaj, Elizabeth A., 2012. "A wavelet based investigation of long memory in stock returns," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 391(7), pages 2330-2341.
    11. Nartea, Gilbert V. & Wu, Ji & Liu, Zhentao, 2013. "Does idiosyncratic volatility matter in emerging markets? Evidence from China," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 137-160.
    12. Amal Aouadi & Mohamed Arouri & Frédéric Teulon, 2014. "Investor Following and Volatility: A GARCH Approach," Working Papers 2014-286, Department of Research, Ipag Business School.
    13. Jubinski, Daniel & Tomljanovich, Marc, 2013. "Do FOMC minutes matter to markets? An intraday analysis of FOMC minutes releases on individual equity volatility and returns," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 86-97.
    14. Lee, Junghoon, 2016. "The impact of idiosyncratic uncertainty when investment opportunities are endogenous," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 105-124.
    15. Jeffrey J. Coulton & Tami Dinh & Andrew B. Jackson & Tom Smith, 2016. "The impact of sentiment on price discovery," Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 56(3), pages 669-694, September.
    16. repec:wsi:qjfxxx:v:04:y:2014:i:04:n:s2010139214500189 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Mitchell Berlin, 2012. "Banks and markets: substitutes, complements, or both?," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q2, pages 1-10.
    18. Mihov, Atanas & Naranjo, Andy, 2017. "Customer-base concentration and the transmission of idiosyncratic volatility along the vertical chain," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 73-100.
    19. Patrick J. Kelly, 2014. "Information Efficiency and Firm-Specific Return Variation," Quarterly Journal of Finance (QJF), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 4(04), pages 1-44.
    20. Gerlach, Richard & Obaydin, Ivan & Zurbruegg, Ralf, 2015. "The impact of leverage on the idiosyncratic risk and return relationship of REITs around the financial crisis," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 207-219.
    21. Nguyen, Nhut H. & Truong, Cameron, 2013. "The information content of stock markets around the world: A cultural explanation," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 1-29.
    22. Boulton, Thomas J. & Campbell, T. Colin, 2016. "Managerial confidence and initial public offerings," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 375-392.
    23. Nartea, Gilbert V. & Wu, Ji, 2013. "Is there a volatility effect in the Hong Kong stock market?," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 119-135.
    24. repec:spr:reaccs:v:22:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11142-017-9411-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    25. repec:kap:rqfnac:v:49:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11156-016-0595-8 is not listed on IDEAS

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