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Bank Health Post-Crisis


  • Kyriakos T. Chousakos
  • Gary B. Gorton


Economic growth is persistently low following a financial crisis, possibly because of a continuing weal banking system. In a financial crisis bank health is significantly damaged. Post-crisis regulatory changes have aimed at restoring bank health, but measuring bank health by Tobin's Q, we find that the ill health of banks in the recent U.S. financial crisis and the Euro crisis has persisted, especially compared to other crises in advanced economies. The low Q's cannot be explained by the state of the macro-economy. The results seem to suggest that bank regulatory changes may be repressive.

Suggested Citation

  • Kyriakos T. Chousakos & Gary B. Gorton, 2017. "Bank Health Post-Crisis," NBER Working Papers 23167, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23167
    Note: CF EFG ME

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Rajkamal Iyer & José-Luis Peydró & Samuel da-Rocha-Lopes & Antoinette Schoar, 2014. "Interbank Liquidity Crunch and the Firm Credit Crunch: Evidence from the 2007--2009 Crisis," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 27(1), pages 347-372, January.
    2. G. B. Gorton & Ping He, 2008. "Bank Credit Cycles," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 75(4), pages 1181-1214.
    3. Carmen M. Reinhart & Graciela L. Kaminsky, 1999. "The Twin Crises: The Causes of Banking and Balance-of-Payments Problems," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 473-500, June.
    4. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2014. "Recovery from Financial Crises: Evidence from 100 Episodes," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(5), pages 50-55, May.
    5. Carola Frydman & Eric Hilt & Lily Y. Zhou, 2015. "Economic Effects of Runs on Early "Shadow Banks": Trust Companies and the Impact of the Panic of 1907," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 123(4), pages 902-940.
    6. Eric S. Rosengren & Joe Peek, 2000. "Collateral Damage: Effects of the Japanese Bank Crisis on Real Activity in the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(1), pages 30-45, March.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G2 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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