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Bank heterogeneity and capital allocation: evidence from \\"fracking\\" shocks

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  • Matthew Plosser

Abstract

This paper empirically investigates banks? ability to reallocate capital. I use unconventional energy development to identify unsolicited deposit inflows and then I estimate how banks allocate these deposits over the recent business cycle. To condition on credit demand, I compare banks? allocations within affected areas over time and in the cross section. When conditions deteriorate, liquid asset allocations increase and loan allocations decrease. Banks with fewer funding sources and higher capital ratios reduce loan allocations more than nearby peers. My results suggest that during adverse times, precautionary liquidity and risk aversion can impede capital reallocation by banks, even in a developed economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthew Plosser, 2014. "Bank heterogeneity and capital allocation: evidence from \\"fracking\\" shocks," Staff Reports 693, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednsr:693
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kristle Romero Cortes & Philip E. Strahan, 2014. "Tracing Out Capital Flows: How Financially Integrated Banks Respond to Natural Disasters," Working Papers (Old Series) 1412, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    2. Gevorkyan, Arkady & Semmler, Willi, 2016. "Oil price, overleveraging and shakeout in the shale energy sector — Game changers in the oil industry," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 244-259.
    3. Ross Levine & Chen Lin & Zigan Wang & Wensi Xie, 2018. "Bank Liquidity, Credit Supply, and the Environment," Working Papers id:12565, eSocialSciences.
    4. Erik P. Gilje, 2019. "Does Local Access to Finance Matter? Evidence from U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Shale Booms," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 65(1), pages 1-18, January.
    5. Knut Are Aastveit & Andrea Carriero & Todd E. Clark & Massimiliano Marcellino, 2017. "Have Standard VARS Remained Stable Since the Crisis?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 32(5), pages 931-951, August.
    6. Kristian Blickle, 2017. "Local Banks, Credit Supply, and House Prices," Working Papers on Finance 1811, University of St. Gallen, School of Finance.
    7. Petkov, Ivan, 2015. "Small Business Lending and the Bank-Branch Network," MPRA Paper 85762, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 13 Oct 2017.
    8. Viktar Fedaseyeu & Erik Gilje & Philip E. Strahan, 2015. "Voter Preferences and Political Change: Evidence from Shale Booms," NBER Working Papers 21789, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Erik Gilje & Elena Loutskina & Philip E. Strahan, 2013. "Exporting Liquidity: Branch Banking and Financial Integration," NBER Working Papers 19403, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial intermediation; banks; business cycles;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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