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Firm Performance and the Volatility of Worker Earnings

Listed author(s):
  • Chinhui Juhn
  • Kristin McCue
  • Holly Monti
  • Brooks Pierce

Using linked employer-employee data for the U.S., we examine whether shocks to firm revenues are transmitted to the earnings of continuing employees. While full insurance is rejected, the elasticity of worker earnings with respect to persistent shocks in firm revenues is small and consistent with the notion that firms insulate workers from idiosyncratic shocks. Exploring heterogeneity of effects, we find the largest elasticity in professional services, among employees in the top 5% of their employers’ earnings distribution, suggesting that in certain jobs performance pay may be a countervailing force to wage insurance.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 23102.

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Date of creation: Jan 2017
Publication status: Forthcoming: Firm Performance and the Volatility of Worker Earnings , Chinhui Juhn, Kristin McCue, Holly Monti, Brooks Pierce. in Firms and the Distribution of Income: The Roles of Productivity and Luck , Lazear and Shaw. 2016
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23102
Note: EFG LS PR
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