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Mediocracy

  • Andrea Mattozzi
  • Antonio Merlo

In this paper, we study the initial recruitment of individuals in the political sector. We propose an equilibrium model of political recruitment by a party who faces competition for political talent from the lobbying sector. We show that a political party may deliberately choose to recruit only mediocre politicians, in spite of the fact that it could afford to recruit better individuals who would like to become politicians. We argue that this finding may contribute to explain the observation that in many countries the political class is mostly composed of mediocre people.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w12920.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 12920.

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Date of creation: Feb 2007
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Publication status: published as Mattozzi, Andrea & Merlo, Antonio, 2015. "Mediocracy," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 32-44.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:12920
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