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Finance for All: The Impact of Financial Literacy Training in Compulsory Secondary Education in Spain

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  • Hospido, Laura

    () (Bank of Spain)

  • Villanueva, Ernesto

    () (Bank of Spain)

  • Zamarro, Gema

    () (University of Southern California)

Abstract

We estimate the impact on objective measures of financial literacy of a 10-hours financial education program among 15-year old students in compulsory secondary schooling. We use a matched sample of students and teachers in Madrid and two different estimation strategies. Firstly, we use reweighting estimators to compare the performance in a test of financial knowledge of students in treatment and control schools. In another specification, we use school fixed-effect estimates of the effect of the course on change in the score in tests of financial knowledge. The program increased treated students' financial knowledge by between one fourth and one third of a standard deviation. We uncover heterogeneous effects, as students in private schools did not increase their knowledge much, possibly due to a less intensive implementation of the program. Secondly, we analyze the bias that arises because the set of schools that participate in financial literacy programs is not random. Such selection bias is estimated as the pre-program performance in financial PISA of students in applicant schools relative to a nationally representative sample of schools. We then study if estimators that condition on school and parental characteristics mitigate selection bias.

Suggested Citation

  • Hospido, Laura & Villanueva, Ernesto & Zamarro, Gema, 2015. "Finance for All: The Impact of Financial Literacy Training in Compulsory Secondary Education in Spain," IZA Discussion Papers 8902, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8902
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    Cited by:

    1. Ignacio García-Pérez, J. & Hidalgo-Hidalgo, Marisa, 2017. "No student left behind? Evidence from the Programme for School Guidance in Spain," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 97-111.
    2. Michael Haliassos & Thomas Jansson & Yigitcan Karabulut & Lauren Cohen, 2020. "Financial Literacy Externalities," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 33(2), pages 950-989.
    3. Tim Kaiser & Lukas Menkhoff, 2017. "Does Financial Education Impact Financial Literacy and Financial Behavior, and If So, When?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 31(3), pages 611-630.
    4. Urban, Carly & Schmeiser, Maximilian & Collins, J. Michael & Brown, Alexandra, 2020. "The effects of high school personal financial education policies on financial behavior," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 78(C).
    5. Bover, Olympia & Hospido, Laura & Villanueva, Ernesto, 2018. "The Impact of High School Financial Education on Financial Knowledge and Choices: Evidence from a Randomized Trial in Spain," IZA Discussion Papers 11265, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Elenita Velikova & Svetla Tzvetkova, 2018. "Options for Overcoming Seasonality in Bulgarian Tourism," European Journal of Economics and Business Studies Articles, European Center for Science Education and Research, vol. 4, EJES May-.
    7. Chaliasos, Michael & Jansson, Thomas & Karabulut, Yigitcan, 2018. "Financial literacy externalities," IMFS Working Paper Series 127, Goethe University Frankfurt, Institute for Monetary and Financial Stability (IMFS).
    8. Shephard, Daniel D. & Kaneza, Yves V. & Moclair, Paul, 2017. "What curriculum? Which methods? A cluster randomized controlled trial of social and financial education in Rwanda," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 310-320.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial education; impact evaluation; selection bias;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid

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