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Does Employing Older Workers Affect Workplace Performance?

Author

Listed:
  • Bryson, Alex

    (University College London)

  • Forth, John

    (Cass Business School)

  • Gray, Helen

    (Institute for Employment Studies (IES))

  • Stokes, Lucy

    (National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR))

Abstract

Focusing on private sector workplaces in Britain, we investigate whether the employment of older workers has implications for workplace performance. We find no significant association between changes in the proportion of older workers employed and changes in workplace performance. We find some evidence that workplace labour productivity falls where the proportion of 'middle-aged' workers falls, either due to a rise in the proportion of older or younger workers, but this association does not carry through to financial performance. Overall, the findings suggest that any reluctance on the part of employers to employ greater numbers of older workers may be misplaced.

Suggested Citation

  • Bryson, Alex & Forth, John & Gray, Helen & Stokes, Lucy, 2019. "Does Employing Older Workers Affect Workplace Performance?," IZA Discussion Papers 12598, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp12598
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    1. Gagliardi, Nicola & Grinza, Elena & Rycx, François, 2021. "Can You Teach an Old Dog New Tricks? New Evidence on the Impact of Tenure on Productivity," GLO Discussion Paper Series 852, Global Labor Organization (GLO).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    older workers; productivity; workplace employment relations survey;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • L25 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Firm Performance
    • M51 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Firm Employment Decisions; Promotions

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