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Educational diversity and knowledge transfers via inter-firm labor mobility

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  • Marino, Marianna
  • Parrotta, Pierpaolo
  • Pozzoli, Dario

Abstract

This article contributes to the literature on knowledge transfer via labor mobility by providing new evidence regarding the role of educational diversity in knowledge transfer. In tracing worker flows between firms in Denmark over the period 1995–2005, we find that knowledge carried by workers who have been previously exposed to educationally diverse workforces significantly increases the productivity of the hiring firms. Several extensions of our baseline specification support this finding and confirm that our variable of interest affects the arrival firm's performance mainly through the knowledge transfer channel.

Suggested Citation

  • Marino, Marianna & Parrotta, Pierpaolo & Pozzoli, Dario, 2016. "Educational diversity and knowledge transfers via inter-firm labor mobility," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 123(C), pages 168-183.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:123:y:2016:i:c:p:168-183
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2015.10.019
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Educational diversity; Knowledge transfer; Inter-firm labor mobility; Firm productivity;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General
    • L20 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - General

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