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Helen Gray

Personal Details

First Name:Helen
Middle Name:
Last Name:Gray
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pbe204
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Institute for Employment Studies (IES)

Brighton, United Kingdom
http://www.employment-studies.co.uk/
RePEc:edi:iesssuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Bryson, Alex & Forth, John & Gray, Helen & Stokes, Lucy, 2019. "Does Employing Older Workers Affect Workplace Performance?," IZA Discussion Papers 12598, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  2. Coleman, Nick & Peters, Mark & Bryson, Alex & Bewley, Helen, 2003. "Working families tax credit and disabled persons's tax credit: a survey of employers," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 4971, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  3. Helen Bewley & Howard Gospel & R Peccei & P Willman, 2003. "Is it Good to Talk? Information Disclosure and Organisational Performance in the UK Incorporating evidence submitted on the DTI discussion paper 'High Performance Workplaces - Informing and Consulting," CEP Discussion Papers dp0602, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  4. Sue Fernie & Helen Gray, 2002. "Its a Family Affair: the Effect of Union Recognition and Human Resource Management on the Provision of Equal Opportunities in the UK," CEP Discussion Papers dp0525, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  5. Helen Gray, 2002. "Family-Friendly Working: What a Performance! An Analysis of the Relationship Between the Availability of Family-Friendly Policies and Establishment Performance," CEP Discussion Papers dp0529, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

Articles

  1. Alex Bryson & John Forth & Helen Gray & Lucy Stokes, 2020. "Does Employing Older Workers Affect Workplace Performance?," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 59(4), pages 532-562, October.
  2. John Forth & Helen Bewley & Alex Bryson & Gill Dix & Sarah Oxenbridge, 2010. "Survey errors and survey costs: a response to Timming’s critique of the Survey of Employees Questionnaire in WERS 2004," Work, Employment & Society, British Sociological Association, vol. 24(3), pages 578-590, September.
  3. Riccardo Peccei & Helen Bewley & Howard Gospel & Paul Willman, 2008. "Look Who's Talking: Sources of Variation in Information Disclosure in the UK," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 46(2), pages 340-366, June.
  4. Helen Bewley, 2006. "Raising the Standard? The Regulation of Employment, and Public Sector Employment Policy," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 44(2), pages 351-372, June.
  5. Riccardo Peccei & Helen Bewley & Howard Gospel & Paul Willman, 2005. "Is It Good to Talk? Information Disclosure and Organizational Performance in the UK," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 43(1), pages 11-39, March.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Bryson, Alex & Forth, John & Gray, Helen & Stokes, Lucy, 2019. "Does Employing Older Workers Affect Workplace Performance?," IZA Discussion Papers 12598, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Justyna Wiktorowicz & Izabela Warwas & Dariusz Turek & Iwa Kuchciak, 2022. "Does generativity matter? A meta-analysis on individual work outcomes," European Journal of Ageing, Springer, vol. 19(4), pages 977-995, December.
    2. Tobias Schultheiss & Uschi Backes‐Gellner, 2023. "Different degrees of skill obsolescence across hard and soft skills and the role of lifelong learning for labor market outcomes," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(3), pages 257-287, July.
    3. Kim, Hoolda & Song Lee, Bun, 2023. "Aging workforce, wages, and productivity: Do older workers drag productivity down in Korea?," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 24(C).
    4. Nicola Gagliardi & Elena Grinza & François Rycx, 2021. "Can You Teach an Old Dog New Tricks? New Evidence on the Impact of Tenure on Productivity," Working Papers CEB 21-007, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    5. Pål Børing, 2021. "The Relationship Between Firm Productivity, Wage Level and Employees’ Age: A Sectoral Perspective," De Economist, Springer, vol. 169(3), pages 367-404, August.
    6. Tobias Schultheiss & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2021. "Different degrees of skill obsolescence across hard and soft skills and the role of lifelong learning for labor market outcomes," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0188, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW), revised Sep 2022.
    7. Nicola Gagliardi & Elena Grinza & François Rycx, 2023. "Workers’ tenure and firm productivity: New evidence from matched employer‐employee panel data," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(1), pages 3-33, January.

  2. Coleman, Nick & Peters, Mark & Bryson, Alex & Bewley, Helen, 2003. "Working families tax credit and disabled persons's tax credit: a survey of employers," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 4971, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    Cited by:

    1. Ghazala Azmat, 2018. "Incidence, Salience and Spillovers: The Direct and Indirect Effects of Tax Credits on Wages," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/cjhqfnej984, Sciences Po.
    2. Ghazala Azmat, 2019. "Incidence, Salience and Spillovers: The Direct and Indirect Effects of Tax Credits on Wages," Post-Print hal-03567413, HAL.

  3. Helen Bewley & Howard Gospel & R Peccei & P Willman, 2003. "Is it Good to Talk? Information Disclosure and Organisational Performance in the UK Incorporating evidence submitted on the DTI discussion paper 'High Performance Workplaces - Informing and Consulting," CEP Discussion Papers dp0602, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

    Cited by:

    1. Josheski, Dushko, 2012. "Socially - optimal level of co-determination of labor and the European directive on workers' councils," MPRA Paper 38196, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  4. Sue Fernie & Helen Gray, 2002. "Its a Family Affair: the Effect of Union Recognition and Human Resource Management on the Provision of Equal Opportunities in the UK," CEP Discussion Papers dp0525, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

    Cited by:

    1. Stephen Machin & Alan Manning, 2002. "The Structure of Wages in What Should be a Competitive Labour Market," CEP Discussion Papers dp0532, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    2. Richard Belfield & David Marsden, 2002. "Matchmaking: the Influence of Monitoring Environments on the Effectiveness of Performance Pay Systems," CEP Discussion Papers dp0543, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. Richard Dickens & Alan Manning, 2004. "Has the national minimum wage reduced UK wage inequality?," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 167(4), pages 613-626, November.
    4. Machin, Stephen & Alan Manning & Lupin Rahman, 2003. "Where Minimum Wage Bites Hard: The Introduction of the UK National Minimum Wage to a Low Wage Sector," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2003 145, Royal Economic Society.
    5. Mann, Catherine L. & Meade, Ellen E., 2002. "Home bias, transactions costs, and prospects for the Euro: A more detailed analysis," Research Notes 6, Deutsche Bank Research.
    6. Bayoumi, Tamim & Haacker, Maarkus, 2002. "It's not what you make, it's how you use IT: measuring the welfare benefits of the IT revolution across countries," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20066, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Chiang Hui-Yu & Noriaki Mamiko Takeuchi, 2008. "The effect of work-life balance policies on women employees turnover," OSIPP Discussion Paper 08E008, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.
    8. Marco Manacorda & Enrico Moretti, 2002. "Intergenerational Transfers and Household Structure. Why Do Most Italian Youths Live With Their Parents?," CEP Discussion Papers dp0536, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    9. Helen Gray, 2002. "Family-Friendly Working: What a Performance! An Analysis of the Relationship Between the Availability of Family-Friendly Policies and Establishment Performance," CEP Discussion Papers dp0529, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    10. Mueller, Elisabeth & Spitz, Alexandra, 2002. "Managerial ownership and firm performance in German small and medium-sized enterprises," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20083, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    11. John Schmitt & Jonathan Wadsworth, 2002. "Give PCs a Chance: Personal Computer Ownership and the Digital Divide in the United States and Great Britain," CEP Discussion Papers dp0526, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    12. Alex Bryson, 2002. "The Union Membership Wage Premium: An Analysis Using Propensity Score Matching," CEP Discussion Papers dp0530, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    13. Wolf, Elke & Heinze, Anja, 2007. "How to Limit Discrimination? Analyzing the Effects of Innovative Workplace Practices on Intra-Firm Gender Wage Gaps Using Linked Employer-Employee Data," ZEW Discussion Papers 07-077, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.

  5. Helen Gray, 2002. "Family-Friendly Working: What a Performance! An Analysis of the Relationship Between the Availability of Family-Friendly Policies and Establishment Performance," CEP Discussion Papers dp0529, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

    Cited by:

    1. Nick Bloom & Tobias Kretschmer & John Van Reenan, 2009. "Work-Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity," NBER Chapters, in: International Differences in the Business Practices and Productivity of Firms, pages 15-54, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. John S. Heywood & Laurie A. Miller, 2015. "Schedule Flexibility, Family Friendly Policies and Absence," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 83(6), pages 652-675, December.
    3. McGinnity F & Russell H, 2011. "Workplace Equality in the Recession? The Incidence and Impact of Equality Policies and Flexible Working," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number BKMNEXT200, August.
    4. Fang, Tony & Lee, Byron & Timming, Andrew R. & Fan, Di, 2019. "The Effects of Work-Life Benefits on Employment Outcomes in Canada: A Multivariate Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 12322, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Monojit Chatterji & Karen Mumford & Peter Smith, 2011. "The public-private sector gender wage differential in Britain: evidence from matched employee-workplace data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(26), pages 3819-3833.
    6. Chatterji, Monojit & Mumford, Karen A. & Smith, Peter N., 2007. "The Public-Private Sector Gender Wage Differential: Evidence from Matched Employee-Workplace Data," IZA Discussion Papers 3158, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Andrea Bassanini & Danielle Venn, 2008. "The Impact of Labour Market Policies on Productivity in OECD Countries," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 17, pages 3-15, Fall.
    8. Rebecca Riley & Hilary Metcalf & John Forth, 2013. "The business case for equal opportunities," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(3), pages 216-239, May.
    9. Manuel Denzer & Philipp Grunau, 2021. "The Impacts of Working from Home on Individual Health and Well-being," Working Papers 2106, Gutenberg School of Management and Economics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz.
    10. Monojit Chatterji & Karen Mumford & Peter N Smith, 2007. "The Public-Private Sector Wage Differential: Gender, Workplaces and Family Friendliness," Dundee Discussion Papers in Economics 202, Economic Studies, University of Dundee.
    11. Maria João Guedes & Maria Eduarda Soares & Pilar Mosquera & João Borregana, 2023. "Does it pay off to offer family-friendly practices? Exploring the missing links to performance," International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, Springer, vol. 19(2), pages 667-690, June.

Articles

  1. Alex Bryson & John Forth & Helen Gray & Lucy Stokes, 2020. "Does Employing Older Workers Affect Workplace Performance?," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 59(4), pages 532-562, October.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Riccardo Peccei & Helen Bewley & Howard Gospel & Paul Willman, 2008. "Look Who's Talking: Sources of Variation in Information Disclosure in the UK," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 46(2), pages 340-366, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Loris Guery & Anne Stévenot, 2017. "L’actionnariat salarié favorise-t-il la diffusion d’information aux salariés et leur participation aux décisions stratégiques ? Une question de gouvernance d’entreprise," Post-Print hal-02500129, HAL.
    2. Chu-Mei Liu & Chieh-Peng Lin, 2018. "Assessing the effects of responsible leadership and ethical conflict on behavioral intention," Review of Managerial Science, Springer, vol. 12(4), pages 1003-1024, October.
    3. Sergio Salis & Allan M. Williams, 2010. "Knowledge Sharing through Face‐to‐Face Communication and Labour Productivity: Evidence from British Workplaces," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 48(2), pages 436-459, June.
    4. Andrew R. Timming, 2009. "WERS the validity? a critique of the 2004 Workplace Employment Relations Survey of employees," Work, Employment & Society, British Sociological Association, vol. 23(3), pages 561-570, September.

  3. Helen Bewley, 2006. "Raising the Standard? The Regulation of Employment, and Public Sector Employment Policy," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 44(2), pages 351-372, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Les Worrall & Kim Mather & Roger Seifert, 2010. "Solving the Labour Problem Among Professional Workers in the UK Public Sector: Organisation Change and Performance Management," Public Organization Review, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 117-137, June.
    2. Thorsten Schulten & Torsten Brandt & Christoph Hermann, 2008. "Liberalisation and privatisation of public services and strategic options for European trade unions," Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, , vol. 14(2), pages 295-311, May.

  4. Riccardo Peccei & Helen Bewley & Howard Gospel & Paul Willman, 2005. "Is It Good to Talk? Information Disclosure and Organizational Performance in the UK," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 43(1), pages 11-39, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Croucher, Richard & Rizov, Marian & Goolaup, Ram, 2014. "The antecedents of direct management communication to employees in Mauritius," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, vol. 25(17), pages 2420-2437.
    2. Josheski, Dushko, 2012. "Socially - optimal level of co-determination of labor and the European directive on workers' councils," MPRA Paper 38196, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Uttara Jangbahadur & Vandna Sharma, 2018. "Measuring Employee Development," Global Business Review, International Management Institute, vol. 19(2), pages 455-476, April.
    4. Sergio Salis & Allan M. Williams, 2010. "Knowledge Sharing through Face‐to‐Face Communication and Labour Productivity: Evidence from British Workplaces," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 48(2), pages 436-459, June.
    5. Arne Nygaard & Harald Biong, 2010. "The Influence of Retail Management’s Use of Social Power on Corporate Ethical Values, Employee Commitment, and Performance," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 97(1), pages 87-108, November.
    6. Rawan Mazen Abukhait & Shaker Bani-Melhem & Rachid Zeffane, 2019. "Empowerment, Knowledge Sharing And Innovative Behaviours: Exploring Gender Differences," International Journal of Innovation Management (ijim), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 23(01), pages 1-28, January.
    7. Mathieu Floquet & Marc Nikitin, 2013. "Faut-il diffuser de l'information financière aux salariés ?," Post-Print hal-01003932, HAL.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-AGE: Economics of Ageing (1) 2019-09-30
  2. NEP-EUR: Microeconomic European Issues (1) 2019-09-30
  3. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (1) 2019-09-30
  4. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (1) 2019-09-30
  5. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2019-09-30

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