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The business case for equal opportunities

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  • Rebecca Riley
  • Hilary Metcalf
  • John Forth

Abstract

It has long been argued that equality of opportunity brings business benefits and that it is in employers' interest to implement policy to promote equality of opportunity. We present new evidence on this issue from the Workplace Employment Relations Survey 2004. There do not appear to be large and widespread business benefits associated with Equal Opportunities policies amongst the establishments that implement these; nor do there appear to be large and widespread costs to businesses of the same. Nevertheless, we suggest that the net benefits to society of Equal Opportunities policies are likely to differ substantially from the net benefits to businesses.
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Suggested Citation

  • Rebecca Riley & Hilary Metcalf & John Forth, 2013. "The business case for equal opportunities," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(3), pages 216-239, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:indrel:v:44:y:2013:i:3:p:216-239
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/irj.12017
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chiara Monfardini & Rosalba Radice, 2008. "Testing Exogeneity in the Bivariate Probit Model: A Monte Carlo Study," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 70(2), pages 271-282, April.
    2. James Heckman & Salvador Navarro-Lozano, 2004. "Using Matching, Instrumental Variables, and Control Functions to Estimate Economic Choice Models," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(1), pages 30-57, February.
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    4. Helen Gray, 2002. "Family-Friendly Working: What a Performance! An Analysis of the Relationship Between the Availability of Family-Friendly Policies and Establishment Performance," CEP Discussion Papers dp0529, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    5. Evan Osborne, 2000. "The Deceptively Simple Economics of Workplace Diversity," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 21(3), pages 463-476, July.
    6. Virginie PeĀ“rotin & Andrew Robinson, 2000. "Employee Participation and Equal Opportunities Practices: Productivity Effect and Potential Complementarities," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 38(4), pages 557-583, December.
    7. Jay Bhattacharya & William B. Vogt, 2007. "Do Instrumental Variables Belong in Propensity Scores?," NBER Technical Working Papers 0343, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Alex Bryson, 2000. "Have British Workers Lost their Voice, or Have they Gained a New One?," PSI Research Discussion Series 2, Policy Studies Institute, UK.
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    Cited by:

    1. McGinnity F & Russell H, 2011. "Workplace Equality in the Recession? The Incidence and Impact of Equality Policies and Flexible Working," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number BKMNEXT200.
    2. Laura C. William, 2016. "The implementation of equality legislation: the case of disabled graduates and reasonable adjustments," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(4), pages 341-359, July.

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