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Workplace Disability Diversity and Job-Related Well-Being in Britain: A WERS2004 Based Analysis

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  • Haile, Getinet Astatike

    (University of Nottingham)

Abstract

This paper attempts to establish empirically whether there is a link between workplace disability and employee job-related well-being. Using nationally representative linked employer-employee data for Britain, I employ alternative econometric techniques to account for unobserved workplace heterogeneity. I find that workplace disability diversity is associated with lower employee well-being among people with no reported disability. Tests conducted also indicate that workplace equality policies do not ameliorate this effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Haile, Getinet Astatike, 2009. "Workplace Disability Diversity and Job-Related Well-Being in Britain: A WERS2004 Based Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 3993, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3993
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    disability diversity; job-related well-being; linked employer-employee data; Britain;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • J82 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Labor Force Composition
    • J7 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being

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