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Unhappy Working with Men? Workplace Gender Diversity and Employee Job-Related Well-Being in Britain: A WERS2004 Based Analysis

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  • Haile, Getinet Astatike

    () (University of Nottingham)

Abstract

This paper attempts to establish empirically the link between workplace gender diversity and employee job-related well-being. Using nationally representative linked employer-employee data for Britain, I employ econometric techniques that account for unobserved workplace heterogeneity. I find that gender diversity is associated with lower employee well-being among women in several of the equations estimated. The magnitudes of the estimated effects also tend to increase with (women's) group size. Workplace equality policies do not appear to ameliorate these effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Haile, Getinet Astatike, 2009. "Unhappy Working with Men? Workplace Gender Diversity and Employee Job-Related Well-Being in Britain: A WERS2004 Based Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 4077, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp4077
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. John M. Abowd & Francis Kramarz & David N. Margolis, 1999. "High Wage Workers and High Wage Firms," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 67(2), pages 251-334, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrea Garnero & Stephan Kampelmann & François Rycx, 2014. "The Heterogeneous Effects of Workforce Diversity on Productivity, Wages, and Profits," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(3), pages 430-477, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    linked employer-employee data; job-related well-being; gender diversity; Britain;

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J82 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Labor Force Composition
    • J7 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being

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