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Disability employment penalties in Britain

Author

Listed:
  • Richard Berthoud

    (Institute for Social and Economic Research University of Essex, UK, berthoud@essex.ac.uk)

Abstract

Economic disadvantage is an increasingly important component of the social position of disabled people.This article uses a large-scale and detailed survey of disabled people as an empirical platform for a discussion of their employment outcomes. It is well-established that disabled people vary in the nature and severity of their impairments, but the shape of the relationship between disability and employment cannot be predicted unambiguously from theory, and has been subject to little analysis. A new measure of `disability employment penalties', taking account of other influences on labour market position, encourages a broader view of disadvantage across distinct social constructs including gender and ethnicity.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Berthoud, 2008. "Disability employment penalties in Britain," Work, Employment & Society, British Sociological Association, vol. 22(1), pages 129-148, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:woemps:v:22:y:2008:i:1:p:129-148
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    File URL: http://wes.sagepub.com/content/22/1/129.abstract
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Pilar García-Gómez & Hans-Martin Gaudecker & Maarten Lindeboom, 2011. "Health, disability and work: patterns for the working age population," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 18(2), pages 146-165, April.
    2. Haile, Getinet Astatike, 2009. "Workplace Disability Diversity and Job-Related Well-Being in Britain: A WERS2004 Based Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 3993, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Haile, Getinet Astatike, 2016. "Workplace Disability: Whose Wellbeing Does It Affect?," IZA Discussion Papers 10102, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Rebecca Fauth & Samantha Parsons & Lucinda Platt, 2014. "Convergence or divergence? A longitudinal analysis of behaviour problems among disabled and non-disabled children aged 3 to 7 in England," DoQSS Working Papers 14-13, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
    5. Melanie K. Jones, 2016. "Disability and Perceptions of Work and Management," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 54(1), pages 83-113, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    disability; disadvantage; employment;

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