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Employment behaviour of marginal workers

  • Nordberg, Morten


    (Ragnar Frisch Centre for Economic Research)

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    We use structural estimation techniques to analyze labour supply effects of changes in economic incentives for individuals who have just finished vocational rehabilitation in Norway. The complicated and sometimes non-convex budget sets for this group are accounted for. Focus is also on the limitation in the choice sets this group face. Parametric bootstrap and simulation techniques are applied to construct confidence intervals for the predicted impacts of changes in the economic environment. The results show that there is a small to moderate effect of changes in economic incentives on the extent to which vocational rehabilitation brings individuals back to work. We also find that individual health status and local labour market conditions are the most important factors affecting the transition from rehabilitation to work.

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    Paper provided by Oslo University, Department of Economics in its series Memorandum with number 06/2007.

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    Length: 48 pages
    Date of creation: 01 Mar 2007
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:hhs:osloec:2007_006
    Contact details of provider: Postal: Department of Economics, University of Oslo, P.O Box 1095 Blindern, N-0317 Oslo, Norway
    Phone: 22 85 51 27
    Fax: 22 85 50 35
    Web page:

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    1. J. Hausman, 1979. "The Effect of Wages, Taxes and Fixed Costs on Women's Labor Force Participation," Working papers 238, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
    2. Lennart Flood & Jörgen Hansen & Roger Wahlberg, 2004. "Household Labor Supply and Welfare Participation in Sweden," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(4).
    3. Bound, John & Burkhauser, Richard V., 1999. "Economic analysis of transfer programs targeted on people with disabilities," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 51, pages 3417-3528 Elsevier.
    4. Mari Rege, Kjetil Telle & Mark Votruba, 2005. "The Effect of Plant Downsizing on Disability Pension Utilization," Discussion Papers 435, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    5. Dagsvik, John K, 1994. "Discrete and Continuous Choice, Max-Stable Processes, and Independence from Irrelevant Attributes," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 62(5), pages 1179-1205, September.
    6. Aaberge, Rolf & Dagsvik, John K & Strom, Steinar, 1995. " Labor Supply Responses and Welfare Effects of Tax Reforms," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 97(4), pages 635-59, December.
    7. David H. Autor & Mark G. Duggan, 2003. "The Rise In The Disability Rolls And The Decline In Unemployment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 118(1), pages 157-205, February.
    8. Brian Bell & James Smith, 2004. "Health, disability insurance and labour force participation," Bank of England working papers 218, Bank of England.
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