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Convergence or divergence? A longitudinal analysis of behaviour problems among disabled and non-disabled children aged 3 to 7 in England

Listed author(s):
  • Rebecca Fauth

    ()

    (School of Arts and Sciences, Tufts University)

  • Samantha Parsons

    ()

    (Department of Quantitative Social Science, Institute of Education)

  • Lucinda Platt

    ()

    (Department of Social Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science)

Registered author(s):

    This study sets out to identify the incidence and development of disabled children’s problem behaviours, including conduct, peer, hyperactivity and emotional problems during the early years using the Millennium Cohort Study, a large-scale, nationally representative UK study. We track the behaviour problems from age 3 to 7 to examine the emergence of problems and whether disabled girls’ and boys’ behaviour converges or diverges from non-disabled children over time. Childhood disability is assessed using three broad measures: developmental delay (DD), long standing limiting illness (LSLI), and special educational needs (SEN) to ascertain the implications of particular constructions of disability. Finally, we examine whether parenting and the home environment moderate any associations between disability and behaviour. Estimating linear growth models, we find that disabled children exhibit more behaviour problems than non-disabled children across disability measures. We find no evidence that trajectories converge for disabled and non-disabled children; rather, children with LSLI and SEN show a greater increase in peer problems, hyperactivity and emotional problems over time. We find little evidence that parenting moderates associations between disability and behaviour. The findings suggest that further in-school support for disabled children may be warranted given persistence in problem behaviour well after school entry.

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    File URL: http://repec.ioe.ac.uk/REPEc/pdf/qsswp1413.pdf
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    Paper provided by Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London in its series DoQSS Working Papers with number 14-13.

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    Date of creation: 05 Sep 2014
    Handle: RePEc:qss:dqsswp:1413
    Contact details of provider: Postal:
    Department of Quantitative Social Science. UCL IOE, 20 Bedford Way London WC1H 0AL

    Phone: (44) (0)20 7612 6654. Eliminate (44) and add (0) if calling from inside the UK. Add (44) and eliminate (0) if calling from abroad.
    Fax: (44) (0)20 7612 6686
    Web page: http://www.ioe.ac.uk/research/departments/qss/35445.html

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    1. Kiernan, Kathleen E. & Huerta, Maria Carmen, 2008. "Economic deprivation, maternal depression, parenting and children's cognitive and emotional development in early childhood," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 43720, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Sophia Rabe-Hesketh & Anders Skrondal, 2012. "Multilevel and Longitudinal Modeling Using Stata, 3rd Edition," Stata Press books, StataCorp LP, edition 3, number mimus2, January.
    3. Richard Berthoud, 2008. "Disability employment penalties in Britain," Work, Employment & Society, British Sociological Association, vol. 22(1), pages 129-148, March.
    4. Tania Burchardt, 2000. "The Dynamics of Being Disabled," CASE Papers case36, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    5. Francois Keslair & Eric Maurin & Sandra McNally, 2011. "An Evaluation of “Special Educational Needs” Programmes in England," CEE Discussion Papers 0129, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    6. Claire Crawford & Anna Vignoles, 2010. "An analysis of the educational progress of children with special educational needs," DoQSS Working Papers 10-19, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
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