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Inactivity Among Prime Age Men in the UK

  • Giulia Faggio
  • Stephen Nickell

Inactivity rates among prime-age men in the UK have risen by at least five times since the early 1970s whereas unemployment rates are much the same. Furthermore, inactivity is strongly concentrated among the unskilled and those suffering from a limiting long-term illness or disability. In our analysis of inactivity rates by region and age group we find that male inactivity responds negatively to variations in the wages of low level occupations and positively to fluctuations in incapacity benefit.

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Paper provided by Centre for Economic Performance, LSE in its series CEP Discussion Papers with number dp0673.

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Date of creation: Feb 2005
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Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp0673
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  1. Nickell, Stephen & Bell, Brian, 1995. "The Collapse in Demand for the Unskilled and Unemployment across the OECD," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(1), pages 40-62, Spring.
  2. Brian Bell & James Smith, 2004. "Health, disability insurance and labour force participation," Bank of England working papers 218, Bank of England.
  3. Jonathan Gruber, 2000. "Disability Insurance Benefits and Labor Supply," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(6), pages 1162-1183, December.
  4. Stephen Nickell & Tracy Jones & Glenda Quintini, 2000. "A picture of job insecurity facing British men," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20141, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  5. repec:oup:qjecon:v:113:y:1998:i:4:p:1245-1279 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Desjonqueres, Thibaut & Machin, Stephen & Van Reenen, John, 1999. " Another Nail in the Coffin? Or Can the Trade Based Explanation of Changing Skill Structures Be Resurrected?," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 101(4), pages 533-54, December.
  7. Richard Layard & Stephen Nickell, 1998. "Labour Market Institutions and Economic Performance," CEP Discussion Papers dp0407, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
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