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New Labour and the Labour Market

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  • Dickens, Richard
  • Gregg, Paul
  • Wadsworth, Jonathan

Abstract

The recent run of good macroeconomic news masks mounting evidence that worklessness is increasingly concentrated on selected individuals, households, and socio-economic groups and in geographical areas. These distributional aspects have been overlooked or ignored over the last 20 years, but we believe they now form the most pressing labour-market and social problems facing this administration. We focus on what we view as the government's selected priorities: the concentration of unemployment on certain individuals, groups, and areas; increasing inactivity, especially marked among less educated, older men; low pay, persistence of low wages, and its relationship with job loss; and the distribution of work across households and child poverty. Many of these problems leave lasting scars on individuals, so that successful intervention may beneficially change an individual's life-chances. We examine the evidence on each of these issues and the current state of policy aimed to reduce their scale or intensity. Copyright 2000 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Dickens, Richard & Gregg, Paul & Wadsworth, Jonathan, 2000. "New Labour and the Labour Market," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(1), pages 95-113, Spring.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:16:y:2000:i:1:p:95-113
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    Cited by:

    1. Alison L. Booth & Marco Francesconi & Jeff Frank, 2002. "Temporary Jobs: Stepping Stones Or Dead Ends?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(480), pages 189-213, June.
    2. Booth, Alison L. & Francesconi, Marco & Frank, Jeff, 2000. "Temporary jobs: who gets them, what are they worth, and do they lead anywhere?," ISER Working Paper Series 2000-13, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    3. Kalwij, Adriaan, 2001. "Individuals' Unemployment Experiences: Heterogeneity and Business Cycle Effects," IZA Discussion Papers 370, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Joanne Lindley & Steven McIntosh, 2010. "Is the Over-Education Wage Penalty Permanent?," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0110, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    5. John Schmitt & Jonathan Wadsworth, 2002. "Is the OECD Jobs Strategy Behind US and British Employment and Unemployment Success in the 1990s?," SCEPA working paper series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2002-06, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
    6. Melanie Jones & Paul Latreille & Peter Sloane, 2006. "Disability, Gender and the Labour Market in Wales," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(8), pages 823-845.
    7. Joanne Lindley & Steven McIntosh, 2008. "A Panel Data Analysis of the Incidence and Impact of Over-education," Working Papers 2008009, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics, revised Jul 2008.

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