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Being and becoming: Social exclusion and the onset of disability

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  • Tania Burchardt

Abstract

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  • Tania Burchardt, 2003. "Being and becoming: Social exclusion and the onset of disability," CASE Reports casereport21, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:sticar:casereport21
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    File URL: http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/dps/case/CR/CASEreport21.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Richard V. Burkhauser & Mary C. Daly, 1998. "Disability and work: the experiences of American and German men," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 17-29.
    2. Regina T. Riphahn, 1999. "Income and employment effects of health shocks A test case for the German welfare state," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 12(3), pages 363-389.
    3. Bardasi, Elena & Jenkins, Stephen P. & Rigg, John A., 2000. "Disability, work and income: a British perspective," ISER Working Paper Series 2000-36, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    4. Asghar Zaidi & Tania Burchardt, 2005. "Comparing Incomes When Needs Differ: Equivalization For The Extra Costs Of Disability In The U.K," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 51(1), pages 89-114, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gannon, Brenda & Nolan, Brian, 2007. "Transitions in Disability and Work/Discapacidad y trabajo: una revisión de la evidencia británica," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 25, pages 447-472, Abril.
    2. Heitmueller, Axel & Inglis, Kirsty, 2004. "Carefree? Participation and Pay Differentials for Informal Carers in Britain," IZA Discussion Papers 1273, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Kavanagh, Anne M. & Aitken, Zoe & Baker, Emma & LaMontagne, Anthony D. & Milner, Allison & Bentley, Rebecca, 2016. "Housing tenure and affordability and mental health following disability acquisition in adulthood," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 225-232.
    4. Heitmueller, Axel & Inglis, Kirsty, 2007. "The earnings of informal carers: Wage differentials and opportunity costs," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 821-841, July.
    5. Heitmueller, Axel, 2007. "The chicken or the egg?: Endogeneity in labour market participation of informal carers in England," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 536-559, May.
    6. Mandemakers, Jornt J. & Monden, Christiaan W.S., 2010. "Does education buffer the impact of disability on psychological distress?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 288-297, July.
    7. Banks, Joanne & Maitre, Bertrand & McCoy, Selina, 2015. "Insights into the Lives of Children with Disabilities: Findings from the 2006 National Disability Survey," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number BKMNEXT274.
    8. McAllister, Susan & Derrett, Sarah & Audas, Rick & Herbison, Peter & Paul, Charlotte, 2013. "Do different types of financial support after illness or injury affect socio-economic outcomes? A natural experiment in New Zealand," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 93-102.
    9. Danacica, Daniela Emanuela & Cirnu, Doru, 2014. "Unemployment Duration and Exit States of Disabled People in Romania," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(1), pages 35-52, March.
    10. Gannon, Brenda & Nolan, Brian, 2007. "The impact of disability transitions on social inclusion," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 64(7), pages 1425-1437, April.

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