IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Disability and Low Income Persistence in Italian Households


  • Parodi, Giuliana
  • Sciulli, Dario


We apply dynamic probit models allowing for unobserved heterogeneity and endogenous initial conditions to IT-SILC data to investigate the low income persistence of households with disabled members. We find that their probability of being in a low income state is higher when compared with households without disabled members. In both cases household head’s characteristics, as employment status and education, contribute to determine low income positions. Our results also support the hypothesis of endogenous initial conditions. Both unobserved heterogeneity and state dependence are important to determine low income positions. Our findings suggest that a structural intervention geared at lifting households out of low income in future requires to get them out of low income at present. Moreover, preventing rather than rescuing actions are preferable.

Suggested Citation

  • Parodi, Giuliana & Sciulli, Dario, 2010. "Disability and Low Income Persistence in Italian Households," MPRA Paper 28303, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:28303

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Lorenzo Cappellari & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2004. "Modelling low income transitions," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(5), pages 593-610.
    2. Dávila Quintana, C. Delia & Malo, Miguel A., 2012. "Poverty dynamics and disability: An empirical exercise using the European community household panel," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 350-359.
    3. Lorenzo Cappellari & Stephen P. Jemkins, 2002. "Who Stays Poor? Who Becomes Poor? Evidence from the British Household Panel Survey," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(478), pages 60-67, March.
    4. Miguel Angel Malo & Fernando Muñoz-Bullón, 2006. "Employment promotion measures and the quality of the job match for persons with disabilities," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 179(4), pages 79-111, September.
    5. repec:mpr:mprres:6179 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Ambra Poggi, 2007. "Does persistence of social exclusion exist in Spain?," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 5(1), pages 53-72, April.
    7. Tania Burchardt & Asghar Zaidi, 2003. "Comparing incomes when needs differ: Equivalisation for the extra costs of disability in the UK," CASE Papers case64, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    8. Shawn Fremstad, 2009. "Half in Ten: Why Taking Disability into Account is Essential to Reducing Income Poverty and Expanding Economic Inclusion," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2009-30, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
    9. Giuliana Parodi & Dario Sciulli, 2008. "Disability in Italian households: income, poverty and labour market participation," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(20), pages 2615-2630.
    10. Stephen P. Jenkins, 2000. "Modelling household income dynamics," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 13(4), pages 529-567.
    11. Anna Giraldo & Enrico Rettore & Ugo Trivellato, 2002. "The persistence of poverty: true state dependence or unobserved heterogeneity? Some evidence from the Italian Survey on Household Income and Wealth," 10th International Conference on Panel Data, Berlin, July 5-6, 2002 B2-1, International Conferences on Panel Data.
    12. Wallace K. C. Mok & Bruce D. Meyer & Kerwin Kofi Charles & Alexandra C. Achen, 2008. "A Note on "The Longitudinal Structure of Earnings Losses among Work-Limited Disabled Workers"," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(3), pages 721-728.
    13. Peter J. Sloane & Melanie K. Jones, 2012. "Disability and Social Exclusion," AIEL Series in Labour Economics,in: Giuliana Parodi & Dario Sciulli (ed.), Social Exclusion. Short and Long Term Causes and Consequences, edition 1, chapter 7, pages 127-148 AIEL - Associazione Italiana Economisti del Lavoro.
    14. Asghar Zaidi & Tania Burchardt, 2005. "Comparing Incomes When Needs Differ: Equivalization For The Extra Costs Of Disability In The U.K," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 51(1), pages 89-114, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Tindara Addabbo & Elena Sarti, 2016. "Access To Work And Disability: The Case Of Italy," Rivista Internazionale di Scienze Sociali, Vita e Pensiero, Pubblicazioni dell'Universita' Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, vol. 134(3-4), pages 239-256.
    2. Agovino, Massimiliano & Ferrara, Maria, 2015. "Disabilità e povertà: il ruolo delle pensioni di invalidità civile. Un'analisi DSGE per i dati italiani
      [Disability and poverty: the role of civilian disability pensions. A DSGE analysis for Italia
      ," MPRA Paper 65616, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. repec:spr:qualqt:v:51:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s11135-016-0347-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Parodi, Giuliana & Sciulli, Dario, 2012. "Disability and Social Exclusion Dynamics in Italian Households," MPRA Paper 42445, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Tindara Addabbo & Elena Sarti, 2014. "Access to work and disability: the case of Italy," Department of Economics 0038, University of Modena and Reggio E., Faculty of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    6. Massimiliano Agovino & Maria Ferrara, 2017. "Can civilian disability pensions overcome the poverty issue? A DSGE analysis for Italian data," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 51(4), pages 1469-1491, July.
    7. Tindara Addabbo & Elena Sarti & Dario Sciulli, 2016. "Disability and Life Satisfaction in Italy," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 11(3), pages 925-954, September.
    8. Massimiliano Agovino & Agnese Rapposelli, 2017. "Macroeconomic impact of flexicurity on the integration of people with disabilities into the labour market. A two-regime spatial autoregressive analysis," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 51(1), pages 307-334, January.

    More about this item


    Income persistence; disability; dynamic probit model; initial conditions.;

    JEL classification:

    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:28303. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Winter) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.