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Disability and Social Exclusion

In: Social Exclusion. Short and Long Term Causes and Consequences


  • Peter J. Sloane

    (Swansea University)

  • Melanie K. Jones

    (Swansea University)


This paper examines the recorded incidence of disability across European countries and draws attention to the considerable measurement problems involved in the economic analysis of the phenomenon. However, the distinction between work-limited and non-work-limited disability turns out to be particularly helpful in understanding labour market outcomes. Finally, policy alternatives for increasing the degree of social inclusion of the disabled population are evaluated.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter J. Sloane & Melanie K. Jones, 2012. "Disability and Social Exclusion," AIEL Series in Labour Economics,in: Giuliana Parodi & Dario Sciulli (ed.), Social Exclusion. Short and Long Term Causes and Consequences, edition 1, chapter 7, pages 127-148 AIEL - Associazione Italiana Economisti del Lavoro.
  • Handle: RePEc:ail:chapts:05-07

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    14. Ciro Avitabile, 2009. "Does Conditionality Matter for Adults' Health? Evidence from a Randomized Experiment," CSEF Working Papers 222, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy, revised 09 Jan 2010.
    15. Rivera, Berta & Currais, Luis, 1999. "Income Variation and Health Expenditure: Evidence for OECD Countries," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(3), pages 258-267, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Giuliana Parodi & Dario Sciulli, 2012. "Disability and low income persistence in Italian households," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 33(1), pages 9-26, March.
    2. Massimiliano Agovino & Agnese Rapposelli, 2017. "Macroeconomic impact of flexicurity on the integration of people with disabilities into the labour market. A two-regime spatial autoregressive analysis," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 51(1), pages 307-334, January.

    More about this item


    Disability; Measurement; Work-Limitations; Government Policy.;

    JEL classification:

    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • J7 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination


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