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Half in Ten: Why Taking Disability into Account is Essential to Reducing Income Poverty and Expanding Economic Inclusion

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  • Shawn Fremstad

Abstract

Disability is both a fundamental cause and consequence of income poverty. The income-poverty rate for persons with disabilities is between two to three times the rate for persons without disabilities. Yet, contemporary policy debate and research about income poverty in the United States is largely silent about disability. This paper argues that we need to have a broader view of what poverty is and also that disability must be taken into account in anti-poverty policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Shawn Fremstad, 2009. "Half in Ten: Why Taking Disability into Account is Essential to Reducing Income Poverty and Expanding Economic Inclusion," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2009-30, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
  • Handle: RePEc:epo:papers:2009-30
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    File URL: http://www.cepr.net/documents/publications/poverty-disability-2009-09.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Debra L. Brucker & Sophie Mitra & Navena Chaitoo & Joseph Mauro, 2014. "More likely to be poor whatever the measure: persons with disabilities in the U.S," Fordham Economics Discussion Paper Series dp2014-01, Fordham University, Department of Economics.
    2. Giuliana Parodi & Dario Sciulli, 2012. "Disability and low income persistence in Italian households," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 33(1), pages 9-26, March.
    3. Parodi, Giuliana & Sciulli, Dario, 2012. "Disability and Social Exclusion Dynamics in Italian Households," MPRA Paper 42445, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Debra L. Brucker & Sophie Mitra & Navena Chaitoo & Joseph Mauro, 2015. "More Likely to Be Poor Whatever the Measure: Working-Age Persons with Disabilities in the United States," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 96(1), pages 273-296, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    poverty; disability;

    JEL classification:

    • I - Health, Education, and Welfare
    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • J - Labor and Demographic Economics
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy

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