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Employee Participation and Equal Opportunities Practices: Productivity Effect and Potential Complementarities


  • Virginie Pe´rotin
  • Andrew Robinson


The relationships between employee participation, equal opportunities practices and productivity are explored. Data from the British Workplace Employee Relations Survey of 1998 provide strong evidence that equal opportunities practices improve productivity overall, and increasingly so as the share of female and ethnic minority employees increases. However, short-term effects may be negative in segregated workplaces. Non-financial participation schemes are negatively associated with productivity, but in most cases the joint presence of these participatory schemes and equal opportunities practices significantly increases productivity. Interactions between participatory and equal opportunities schemes are also affected by work-force composition and by the level of equal opportunities policies implemented. Copyright Blackwell Publishers Ltd/London School of Economics 2000.

Suggested Citation

  • Virginie Pe´rotin & Andrew Robinson, 2000. "Employee Participation and Equal Opportunities Practices: Productivity Effect and Potential Complementarities," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 38(4), pages 557-583, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:38:y:2000:i:4:p:557-583

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Colin Green & John Heywood, 2012. "Don't Forget the Gravy! Are Bonuses and Time Rates Complements?," Working Papers 13424023, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    2. Brian Bell & John Van Reenen, 2011. "Firm Performance and Wages: Evidence from Across the Corporate Hierarchy," CEP Discussion Papers dp1088, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. John Forth & Alex Bryson & Lucy Stokes, 2016. "Are firms paying more for performance?," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(2), pages 323-343, May.
    4. Stephen Nickell & Glenda Quintini, 2003. "Nominal wage rigidity and the rate of inflation," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(490), pages 762-781, October.
    5. David G. Blanchflower & Andrew J. Oswald & Peter Sanfey, 1996. "Wages, Profits, and Rent-Sharing," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(1), pages 227-251.
    6. Paul J. Devereux, 2001. "The Cyclicality of Real Wages within Employer-Employee Matches," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 54(4), pages 835-850, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Chicha, Marie-Thérèse., 2006. "Analyse comparative de la mise en oeuvre du droit à l'égalité de rémunération : modèles et impacts," ILO Working Papers 993920333402676, International Labour Organization.
    2. Gray, Helen, 2002. "Family-friendly working: what a performance! An analysis of the relationship between the availability of family-friendly policies and establishment performance," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20082, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Haile, Getinet Astatike, 2009. "Workplace Disability Diversity and Job-Related Well-Being in Britain: A WERS2004 Based Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 3993, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Annemarie Künn-Nelen & Andries de Grip & Didier Fouarge, 2013. "Is Part-Time Employment Beneficial for Firm Productivity?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 66(5), pages 1172-1191, October.
    5. Fakhfakh F. & Perotin V. & Gago M., 2009. "Productivity, Capital and Labor in Labor-Managed and Conventional Firms," Working Papers ERMES 0910, ERMES, University Paris 2.
    6. Chicha, Marie-Thérèse., 2006. "A comparative analysis of promoting pay equity : models and impacts," ILO Working Papers 993995243402676, International Labour Organization.
    7. Rebecca Riley & Hilary Metcalf & John Forth, 2013. "The business case for equal opportunities," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(3), pages 216-239, May.
    8. repec:ilo:ilowps:392033 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Pérotin, V. & Robinson, A. & Loundes, J., 2003. "Equal opportunities practices and enterprise performance," ILO Working Papers 993631533402676, International Labour Organization.

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