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The Impact of Internal Displacement on Destination Communities: Evidence from the Colombian Conflict

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  • Juan S. Morales

    () (Department of Economics, University of Toronto)

Abstract

More than ten percent of the population of Colombia has been forced to migrate due to civil war. This study employs an enclave IV strategy, which exploits social distance between origin and destination locations, as well as conflict induced migration, to estimate the impact that the arrival of displaced individuals has on local residents. I compare the effects on four different subgroups of the population, partitioned by skill (low-skilled versus high-skilled) and by gender. The analysis suggests that a conflict-induced increase in population leads to a short-run negative impact on wages. Though the impact tends to dissipate over time, it persists for one group, low-skilled women. The arrival of internally displaced people also affects local access to public goods, I find a negative effect on access to piped water, and a positive effect on access to trash collection services.

Suggested Citation

  • Juan S. Morales, 2016. "The Impact of Internal Displacement on Destination Communities: Evidence from the Colombian Conflict," HiCN Working Papers 209, Households in Conflict Network.
  • Handle: RePEc:hic:wpaper:209
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:ris:invreg:0376 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:deveco:v:134:y:2018:i:c:p:289-309 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    civil conflict; migration; labour markets; public goods;

    JEL classification:

    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods
    • J40 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - General
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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