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The Interaction Between Fiscal and Monetary Policies: Evidence from Sweden

Author

Listed:
  • Ankargren, Sebastian

    () (Uppsala University)

  • Shahnazarian, Hovick

    (Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of Sweden)

Abstract

This paper estimates the interaction between monetary- and fiscal policy using a structural VAR model with time-varying parameters. For demand and supply shocks, the two policies are estimated to be complementary, while for monetary and fiscal policies shocks the two policies act as substitutes. The budget elasticity varies between 0.3–0.6, indicating that an economic downturn can get a non-negligible negative impact on public finances. The fiscal multiplier is estimated to be stable and higher than one suggesting that fiscal policy can be used to support monetary policy to stabilize the economy in case monetary policy is constrained by the lower effective bound.

Suggested Citation

  • Ankargren, Sebastian & Shahnazarian, Hovick, 2019. "The Interaction Between Fiscal and Monetary Policies: Evidence from Sweden," Working Paper Series 365, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden), revised 01 Apr 2019.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:rbnkwp:0365
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fiscal policy; monetary policy; time-varying parameter structural VAR; zero and sign restrictions; Bayesian estimation;

    JEL classification:

    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • E63 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Comparative or Joint Analysis of Fiscal and Monetary Policy; Stabilization; Treasury Policy

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