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Do R&D and ICT Affect Total Factor Productivity Growth Differently?

Author

Listed:
  • Edquist, Harald

    () (Ericsson Research)

  • Henrekson, Magnus

    () (Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN))

Abstract

We analyze the effect of ICT and R&D on total factor productivity (TFP) growth across different industries in Sweden. R&D alone is significantly associated with contemporaneous TFP growth, thus exhibiting indirect effects. Although there is no significant short-run association between ICT and TFP, we find a positive association with a lag of seven to eight years. Thus, R&D affect TFP much faster than ICT-investments. We also divide ICT capital into hardware and software capital. To our knowledge, this distinction has not been made in any previous study analyzing TFP at the industry level. The results show that lagged hardware capital services growth is significantly associated with TFP growth. Hence, investments complementary to hardware are needed to reap the long-run TFP effects from reorganizing production.

Suggested Citation

  • Edquist, Harald & Henrekson, Magnus, 2016. "Do R&D and ICT Affect Total Factor Productivity Growth Differently?," Working Paper Series 1108, Research Institute of Industrial Economics, revised 28 Nov 2016.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:iuiwop:1108
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    ICT; R&D; Hardware; Software; Total factor productivity; Panel data analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • L16 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Industrial Organization and Macroeconomics; Macroeconomic Industrial Structure
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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