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Learning Organisations: the importance of work organisation for innovation

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  • Nathalie Greenan

    () (TEPP - Travail, Emploi et Politiques Publiques - UPEM - Université Paris-Est Marne-la-Vallée - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, CEE - Centre d'études de l'emploi - M.E.N.E.S.R. - Ministère de l'Education nationale, de l’Enseignement supérieur et de la Recherche - Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé)

  • Edward Lorenz

    () (GREDEG - Groupe de Recherche en Droit, Economie et Gestion - UNS - Université Nice Sophia Antipolis - UCA - Université Côte d'Azur - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

Innovation is widely recognised as an important engine of growth. The underlying approach to innovation has been changing, shifting away from models largely focused on Research and Development (R&D) in knowledge-based globalised economies and giving more emphasis to other major sources of the innovation process. Understanding how organisations build up resources for innovation has thus become a crucial challenge to find new ways of supporting innovation in all areas of activity. This report supports and contributes to this widened approach to innovation analysis and policy by showing the importance of work organisation, interactions within organisations, as well as individual and organisational learning and training for innovation. The analytical tools and empirical results it provides are designed to open the black box of what a learning organisation is, that is, a work organisation supporting innovation through the use of employee autonomy and discretion, supported by learning and training opportunities.

Suggested Citation

  • Nathalie Greenan & Edward Lorenz, 2009. "Learning Organisations: the importance of work organisation for innovation," Working Papers halshs-01376968, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:halshs-01376968
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01376968
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    References listed on IDEAS

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