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Segregated Integration: Recent Trends in the Austrian Gender Division of Labor

Author

Listed:
  • Margareta Kreimer

    () (University of Graz)

  • Ricardo Mora

    () (Universidad Carlos III)

Abstract

Using micro data from the Austrian Labor Force Survey from 1996 to 2010, this paper explores the effects on gender segregation of two opposing trends in gender differentials: decreasing gender differentials in participation rates and increasing gender differentials in the incidence of part-time jobs. To do so, we propose an index for the gender division of labor and look at the contributions of gender differences in participation, the incidence of part-time jobs, and in occupational choices to its evolution. Our main results show that the gender division of labor is very stable over the 15-year period. This is because the positive effects from the rising female labor force participation rates are counterbalanced by the negative effects from increasing gender differences in the incidence of part-time jobs. We also find that occupational segregation is the most important source of the gender division of labor and that its contribution remains stable throughout the entire period. These results are robust to alternative definitions of economic activity and labor market involvement and are also found after controlling for educational levels and fields.

Suggested Citation

  • Margareta Kreimer & Ricardo Mora, 2016. "Segregated Integration: Recent Trends in the Austrian Gender Division of Labor," Graz Economics Papers 2016-06, University of Graz, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:grz:wpaper:2016-06
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender Division of Labor; Sources of Gender Segregation; Segregation Indexes; Mutual Information;

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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