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Educational presorting as a cause of occupational segregation

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  • Borghans L.
  • Groot L.

    (ROA rm)

Abstract

This article concentrates on the measurement of both occupational and educational segre gation between the men and women of the Dutch labour force. The majority of studies which have been conducted in this area are rather one-sided, concentrating on occupational segregation alone. However, occupational segregation can be split into three components. The first component concerns presorting as a consequence of the different educational choices made by boys and girls. The second component concerns postsorting (given their educational status), as a result of the differing occupational choices and opportunities for promotion between men and women during their careers. If men and women with the same educational background are directed towards different occupations, then postsorting may add to the occupational segregation which was already induced by the earlier educational segregation. This kind of postsorting increases the gap between occupational and educational segregation. The third component, which we refer to as reintegration is also a kind of postsorting, narrowing the gap between occupational and educational segregation. This occurs when men with a ''male type'' of education and women with a ''female type'' of education come together in one occupation. Given that educational segregation of the labour force is fixed in the short term, reintegration is the only effective, but probably difficult affirmative action program to reduce occupational segregation in the short term. More usual programs are ineffective and can even be counterproductive. After using the Duncan and Duncan segregation index we construct new segregation indices which measure the relative importance of pre- and postsorting in the occupational segregation more accurately. A more detailed insight into these three components is relevant when choosing the policy instruments needed to achieve equal employment opportunities for men and women.

Suggested Citation

  • Borghans L. & Groot L., 1999. "Educational presorting as a cause of occupational segregation," ROA Research Memorandum 003, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:umaror:1999003
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    File URL: https://cris.maastrichtuniversity.nl/portal/files/567784/content
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Boisso, Dale & Hayes, Kathy & Hirschberg, Joseph & Silber, Jacques, 1994. "Occupational segregation in the multidimensional case : Decomposition and tests of significance," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 161-171, March.
    2. Andrea H. Beller, 1982. "Occupational Segregation by Sex: Determinants and Changes," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 17(3), pages 371-392.
    3. Mary E. Corcoran & Paul N. Courant, 1987. "Sex-Role Socialization and Occupational Segregation: An Exploratory Investigation," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(3), pages 330-346, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Vendrik Maarten & Cörvers Frank, 2009. "Male and female labour force participation: the role of dynamic adjustments to changes in labour demand, government policies and autonomous trends," Research Memorandum 036, Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR).
    2. Schneeweis, Nicole & Zweimüller, Martina, 2012. "Girls, girls, girls: Gender composition and female school choice," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 482-500.
    3. José Manuel Cordero Ferrera & Rosa Simancas Rodríguez (ed.), 2016. "Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación," E-books Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación, Asociación de Economía de la Educación, edition 1, volume 11, number 11, Winter.
    4. Kreimer, Margareta & Mora, Ricardo, 2013. "Segregated integration : recent trends in the Austrian gender division of labor," UC3M Working papers. Economics we1317, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    5. Görlich Dennis & Grip Andries de, 2007. "Human Capital Depreciation during Family-related Career Interruptions in Male and Female Occupations," ROA Research Memorandum 007, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    6. Christelle Garrouste, 2016. "Girls and science in France," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 11,in: José Manuel Cordero Ferrera & Rosa Simancas Rodríguez (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 11, edition 1, volume 11, chapter 41, pages 733-752 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    7. Borghans, Lex & Groot, Loek, 1999. "Educational presorting and occupational segregation," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 375-395, September.
    8. Benoît Rapoport & Claire Thibout, 2016. "Why Do Boys and Girls Make Different Educational Choices? The Influence of Expected Earnings and Test Scores," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2016n01, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.

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    Keywords

    education; training and the labour market;

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