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Educational presorting and occupational segregation

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  • Borghans, Lex
  • Groot, Loek

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  • Borghans, Lex & Groot, Loek, 1999. "Educational presorting and occupational segregation," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 375-395, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:6:y:1999:i:3:p:375-395
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Borghans L. & Groot L., 1999. "Educational presorting as a cause of occupational segregation," ROA Research Memorandum 003, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    2. Boisso, Dale & Hayes, Kathy & Hirschberg, Joseph & Silber, Jacques, 1994. "Occupational segregation in the multidimensional case : Decomposition and tests of significance," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 161-171, March.
    3. Watts, Martin & Rich, Judith, 1993. "Occupational Sex Segregation in Britain, 1979-1989: The Persistence of Sexual Stereotyping," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(2), pages 159-177, June.
    4. Andrea H. Beller, 1982. "Occupational Segregation by Sex: Determinants and Changes," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 17(3), pages 371-392.
    5. Karmel, T & Maclachlan, M, 1988. "Occupational Sex Segregation--Increasing or Decreasing?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 64(186), pages 187-195, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Vendrik Maarten & Cörvers Frank, 2009. "Male and female labour force participation: the role of dynamic adjustments to changes in labour demand, government policies and autonomous trends," Research Memorandum 036, Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR).
    2. Schneeweis, Nicole & Zweimüller, Martina, 2012. "Girls, girls, girls: Gender composition and female school choice," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 482-500.
    3. Jairo Gillermo Isaza Castro, 2010. "Occupational segregation and gender wage differences: evidence from Urban Colombia," SERIE DE DOCUMENTOS EN ECONOMÍA Y VIOLENCIA 006889, CENTRO DE INVESTIGACIONES EN VIOLENCIA, INSTITUCIONES Y DESARROLLO ECONÓMICO (VIDE).
    4. José Manuel Cordero Ferrera & Rosa Simancas Rodríguez (ed.), 2016. "Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación," E-books Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación, Asociación de Economía de la Educación, edition 1, volume 11, number 11, September.
    5. Aleksander Kucel & Montserrat Vilalta-Bufi, 2012. "Why do university graduates regret their study program? A comparison between Spain and the Netherlands," Working Papers in Economics 279, Universitat de Barcelona. Espai de Recerca en Economia.
    6. Mora, Ricardo & Ruiz-Castillo, Javier, 2005. "The axiomatic properties of an entropy based index of segregation," UC3M Working papers. Economics we056231, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    7. Kreimer, Margareta & Mora, Ricardo, 2013. "Segregated integration : recent trends in the Austrian gender division of labor," UC3M Working papers. Economics we1317, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    8. Görlich Dennis & Grip Andries de, 2007. "Human Capital Depreciation during Family-related Career Interruptions in Male and Female Occupations," ROA Research Memorandum 007, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    9. Christelle Garrouste, 2016. "Girls and science in France," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 11,in: José Manuel Cordero Ferrera & Rosa Simancas Rodríguez (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 11, edition 1, volume 11, chapter 41, pages 733-752 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    10. Markus Gangl, 2000. "Education and Labour Market Entry across Europe : The Impact of Institutional Arrangements in Training Systems and Labour Markets," MZES Working Papers 25, MZES.
    11. Benoît Rapoport & Claire Thibout, 2016. "Why Do Boys and Girls Make Different Educational Choices? The Influence of Expected Earnings and Test Scores," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2016n01, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    12. Boudarbat, Brahim & Montmarquette, Claude, 2007. "Choice of Fields of Study of Canadian University Graduates: The Role of Gender and their Parents’ Education," IZA Discussion Papers 2552, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Van Puyenbroeck, Tom & De Bruyne, Karolien & Sels, Luc, 2012. "More than ‘Mutual Information’: Educational and sectoral gender segregation and their interaction on the Flemish labor market," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 1-8.
    14. Ricardo Mora & Javier Ruiz-Castillo, 2004. "Gender segregation by occupations in the public and the private sector.The case of Spain," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, vol. 28(3), pages 399-428, September.
    15. Ricardo Mora & Javier Ruiz-Castillo, 2003. "Additively Decomposable Segregation Indexes. The Case of Gender Segregation by Occupations and Human Capital Levels in Spain," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 1(2), pages 147-179, August.
    16. Antecol, Heather & Cobb-Clark, Deborah A., 2013. "Do psychosocial traits help explain gender segregation in young people's occupations?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 59-73.
    17. Thomas Leoni & Martin Falk, 2010. "Gender and field of study as determinants of self-employment," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 167-185, February.
    18. Mora, Ricardo & Ruiz-Castillo, Javier, 2000. "Gender segregation : from birth to occupation," UC3M Working papers. Economics 9921, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    19. Guinea-Martin, Daniel & Mora, Ricardo & Ruiz-Castillo, Javier, 2012. "The joint effect of ethnicity and gender on occupational segregation : an approach based on the Mutual Information Index," UC3M Working papers. Economics we1140, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    20. Emer Smyth, 2002. "Gender Differentiation and Early Labour Market Integration across Europe," MZES Working Papers 46, MZES.
    21. Mora, Ricardo & Ruiz-Castillo, Javier, 2003. "An evaluation of an entropy based index of segregation," UC3M Working papers. Economics we034014, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    22. Sookram, Sandra & Strobl, Eric, 2008. "The Role of Educational Choice in Occupational Gender Segregation: Evidence from Trinidad and Tobago," IZA Discussion Papers 3549, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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