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Gender Segregation By Occupation In The Public And The Private Sector. The Case Of Spain

  • Ricardo Mora

    ()

  • Javier Ruiz-Castillo

    ()

In many countries, recruiting and promotion procedures in the public sector would appear to leave less room for gender discrimination than in the private sector. Using data for Spain in 1977 and 1992, this paper explores the consequences of these practices for gender segregation in those occupations where there is a private and a public sector of a minimum size. In particular, an additive index based on the entropy concept is used to compare occupational gender segregation in the private versus the public sector. It is found that gender segregation in the private sector is 14% larger than in the public sector in 1977 and 32% larger in 1992. During the 1977-1992 period, gender segregation in the public sector remains basically constant but increases by 15% in the private sector. The additive decomposability property of the index is used to highlight the role of public hiring procedures and other socio-economic factors in differences of gender segregation across occupations.

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File URL: http://docubib.uc3m.es/WORKINGPAPERS/WE/we031604.pdf
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Paper provided by Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Economía in its series Economics Working Papers with number we031604.

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Date of creation: Mar 2003
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Handle: RePEc:cte:werepe:we031604
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  1. Juan J. Dolado & Florentino Felgueroso & Juan F. Jimeno., . "Recent Trends in Occupational Segregation by Gender: A Look Across the Atlantic," Working Papers 2002-11, FEDEA.
  2. Barbara R. Bergmann, 1974. "Occupational Segregation, Wages and Profits When Employers Discriminate by Race or Sex," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 1(2), pages 103-110, April.
  3. Deutsch, Joseph & Fluckiger, Yves & Silber, Jacques, 1994. "Measuring occupational segregation : Summary statistics and the impact of classification errors and aggregation," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 133-146, March.
  4. Francine D. Blau & Wallace E. Hendricks, 1979. "Occupational Segregation by Sex: Trends and Prospects," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 14(2), pages 197-210.
  5. Borghans, Lex & Groot, Loek, 1999. "Educational presorting and occupational segregation," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 375-395, September.
  6. Boisso, Dale & Hayes, Kathy & Hirschberg, Joseph & Silber, Jacques, 1994. "Occupational segregation in the multidimensional case : Decomposition and tests of significance," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 161-171, March.
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