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Gender segregation by occupations in the public and the private sector.The case of Spain

  • Ricardo Mora

    (Universidad Carlos III de Madrid)

  • Javier Ruiz-Castillo

    (Universidad Carlos III de Madrid)

In many countries, non-discriminatory recruiting procedures, as well as other job characteristics, make public sector employment especially attractive to women. In the first empirical paper comparing gender segregation in the public and the private sectors, an additively decomposable segregation index based on the entropy concept is applied to Spanish data for the 1977-1992 period. It is found that during this period the gender segregation related to sector choices is larger in the public sector. But this is offset by the fact that gender segregation induced by occupational choices is larger within the private sector. The difference in occupational gender segregation between the two sectors is mainly accounted for gender composition effects in 1977 and occupational mix effects in 1992. (Copyright: Fundación SEPI)

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Article provided by Fundación SEPI in its journal Investigaciones Económicas.

Volume (Year): 28 (2004)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages: 399-428

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Handle: RePEc:iec:inveco:v:28:y:2004:i:3:p:399-428
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  1. Deutsch, Joseph & Fluckiger, Yves & Silber, Jacques, 1994. "Measuring occupational segregation : Summary statistics and the impact of classification errors and aggregation," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 133-146, March.
  2. Barbara R. Bergmann, 1974. "Occupational Segregation, Wages and Profits When Employers Discriminate by Race or Sex," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 1(2), pages 103-110, April.
  3. Dolado, Juan J. & Felgueroso, Florentino & Jimeno, Juan F., 2002. "Recent Trends in Occupational Segregation by Gender: A Look Across the Atlantic," IZA Discussion Papers 524, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Borghans, Lex & Groot, Loek, 1999. "Educational presorting and occupational segregation," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 375-395, September.
  5. Boisso, Dale & Hayes, Kathy & Hirschberg, Joseph & Silber, Jacques, 1994. "Occupational segregation in the multidimensional case : Decomposition and tests of significance," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 161-171, March.
  6. Francine D. Blau & Wallace E. Hendricks, 1979. "Occupational Segregation by Sex: Trends and Prospects," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 14(2), pages 197-210.
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