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Out of sight, out of mind? Educational outcomes of children with parents working abroad

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Abstract

Impact of parental emigration on educational outcomes of children is theoretically ambiguous. Using novel data I collected on migration experience and its timing, family background and school performance of lower secondary pupils in Poland, I analyse the question empirically. Migration is mostly temporary in nature, with one parent engaging in employment abroad. As many as 63% of migrant parents have vocational qualifications, 29% graduated from high school, 4% have no qualifications and the remaining 4% graduated from university. Almost 18% of children are affected by parental migration. Perhaps surprisingly, estimates suggest that parental employment abroad has a positive immediate impact on a pupil's grade. Parental education appears pivotal; children of high school graduates benefit most. Longer term effects appear more negative, however, suggesting that a prolonged migration significantly lowers a child's grade. Interestingly, siblings' foreign experiences exert a large, positive impact on pupils' grades.

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  • Joanna Clifton-Sprigg, 2014. "Out of sight, out of mind? Educational outcomes of children with parents working abroad," Edinburgh School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 251, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh.
  • Handle: RePEc:edn:esedps:251
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    3. Bonin, Holger & Krause-Pilatus, Annabelle & Rinne, Ulf & Brücker, Herbert, 2020. "Wirtschaftliche Effekte der EU-Arbeitskräftemobilität in den Ziel- und Herkunftsländern," IZA Research Reports 102, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Zhang, Yi & Matz, Julia Anna, 2017. "On the train to brain gain in rural China," Discussion Papers 252443, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    education of adolescents; migration;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • I29 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Other
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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