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Out of sight, out of mind? Educational outcomes of children with parents working abroad

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Abstract

Impact of parental emigration on educational outcomes of children is theoretically ambiguous. Using novel data I collected on migration experience and its timing, family background and school performance of lower secondary pupils in Poland, I analyse the question empirically. Migration is mostly temporary in nature, with one parent engaging in employment abroad. As many as 63% of migrant parents have vocational qualifications, 29% graduated from high school, 4% have no qualifications and the remaining 4% graduated from university. Almost 18% of children are affected by parental migration. Perhaps surprisingly, estimates suggest that parental employment abroad has a positive immediate impact on a pupil's grade. Parental education appears pivotal; children of high school graduates benefit most. Longer term effects appear more negative, however, suggesting that a prolonged migration significantly lowers a child's grade. Interestingly, siblings' foreign experiences exert a large, positive impact on pupils' grades.

Suggested Citation

  • Joanna Clifton-Sprigg, 2014. "Out of sight, out of mind? Educational outcomes of children with parents working abroad," ESE Discussion Papers 251, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh.
  • Handle: RePEc:edn:esedps:251
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    File URL: http://www.econ.ed.ac.uk/papers/id251_esedps.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Clifton-Sprigg, Joanna, 2015. "Educational spillovers and parental migration," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 64-75.
    2. Clifton-Sprigg, Joanna, 2014. "Educational spillovers and parental migration," SIRE Discussion Papers 2015-46, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    3. Zhang, Yi & Matz, Julia Anna, 2017. "On the train to brain gain in rural China," Discussion Papers 252443, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    education of adolescents; migration;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • I29 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Other
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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