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US Monetary Policy and the Euro Area

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  • Max Hanisch

Abstract

This study investigates the international spillover effects of contractionary US monetary policy and its transmission channels on members of the euro area (EA) before and after the implementation of the euro. I find the multilateral spillover effects on individual EA economies' real activity and inflation to be asymmetric, i.e. the responses are mainly expansionary but not exclusively so. While the effects are diverse and rather large before 1999, responses become more homogeneous and smaller in size after the implementation of the euro. However, country-specific asymmetries remain. Trade and interest rates but also credit, stock and housing markets are identified as important transmission channels.

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  • Max Hanisch, 2017. "US Monetary Policy and the Euro Area," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1701, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp1701
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Structural dynamic factor model; sign restrictions; monetary policy; US; Euro area; spillover effects;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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