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Distance Learning in Higher Education: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment

Author

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  • Cacault, Maria Paula
  • Hildebrand, Christian
  • Laurent-Lucchetti, Jérémy
  • Pellizzari, Michele

Abstract

Using a randomized experiment in a public Swiss university, we study the impact of online live streaming of lectures on student achievement and attendance. We find that (i) students use the live streaming technology only punctually, apparently when random events make attending in class too costly; (ii) attending lectures via live streaming lowers achievement for low-ability students and increases achievement for high-ability ones and (iii) offering live streaming reduces in-class attendance only mildly. These findings have important implications for the design of education policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Cacault, Maria Paula & Hildebrand, Christian & Laurent-Lucchetti, Jérémy & Pellizzari, Michele, 2019. "Distance Learning in Higher Education: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment," CEPR Discussion Papers 13666, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:13666
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    Cited by:

    1. Philipp Hansen & Lennart Struth & Max Thon & Tim Umbach, 2021. "The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Teaching Outcomes in Higher Education," ECONtribute Discussion Papers Series 073, University of Bonn and University of Cologne, Germany.
    2. Wada, Shuhei, 2021. "Online education and the Great Convergence," MPRA Paper 108793, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Merkus, Erik & Schafmeister, Felix, 2021. "The role of in-person tutorials in higher education," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 201(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    distance learning; EduTech; live streaming;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education

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