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The Real Effects of Monetary Shocks: Evidence from Micro Pricing Moments

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  • Gee Hee Hong
  • Matthew Klepacz
  • Ernesto Pasten
  • Raphael Schoenle

Abstract

Cross-sectional variation in micro data can be used to empirically evaluate sufficient statistics for the response of aggregate variables to policy shocks of interest. We demonstrate an easy-to-use approach through a detailed example. We evaluate the sufficiency of micro pricing moments for the aggregate real effects of monetary policy shocks. Our analysis shows how a widely held notion about the kurtosis of price changes, as sufficient for summarizing the selection effect, turns out not to hold empirically. On theoretical grounds, we show how a small change in assumptions - removing random menu costs - can nonetheless reconcile the predictions of the existing theoretical literature with our empirical regularities.

Suggested Citation

  • Gee Hee Hong & Matthew Klepacz & Ernesto Pasten & Raphael Schoenle, 2020. "The Real Effects of Monetary Shocks: Evidence from Micro Pricing Moments," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 875, Central Bank of Chile.
  • Handle: RePEc:chb:bcchwp:875
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Foellmi, Reto & Jäggi, Adrian & Schnell, Fabian, 2020. "Currency appreciation, distance to border and price changes: Evidence from Swiss retail prices," CEPR Discussion Papers 15019, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Alvarez, Fernando & Ferrara, Andrea & Gautier, Erwan & Le Bihan, Hervé & Lippi, Francesco, 2021. "Empirical Investigation of a Sufficient Statistic for Monetary Shocks," CEPR Discussion Papers 16626, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Henkel, Lukas, 2020. "Sectoral output effects of monetary policy: do sticky prices matter?," Working Paper Series 2473, European Central Bank.

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