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Selection and monetary non-neutrality in time-dependent pricing models

Listed author(s):
  • Carvalho, Carlos
  • Schwartzman, Felipe

For a given frequency of price adjustment, monetary non-neutrality is smaller if older prices are disproportionately more likely to change. Selection for the age of prices provides a complete characterization of price-setting frictions in time-dependent models. Selection for older prices is weaker and non-neutralities are larger if the hazard function of price adjustment is less strongly increasing. Selection is weaker if there is heterogeneity in price stickiness. Finally, selection is weaker if durations of price spells are more variable. In particular, the Taylor (1979) model exhibits maximal selection for older prices, whereas the Calvo (1983) model exhibits no selection.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304393215001105
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Monetary Economics.

Volume (Year): 76 (2015)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 141-156

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Handle: RePEc:eee:moneco:v:76:y:2015:i:c:p:141-156
DOI: 10.1016/j.jmoneco.2015.09.002
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505566

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