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Is the Volatility of the Market Price of Risk due to Intermittent Portfolio Re-balancing?

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  • Yi-Li Chien
  • Harold L. Cole
  • Hanno Lustig

Abstract

Our paper examines whether the well-documented failure of unsophisticated investors to rebalance their portfolios can help to explain the enormous counter-cyclical volatility of aggregate risk compensation in financial markets. To answer this question, we set up a model in which CRRA-utility investors have heterogeneous trading technologies. In our model, a large mass of investors do not re-balance their portfolio shares in response to aggregate shocks, while a smaller mass of active investors adjust their portfolio each period to respond to changes in the investment opportunity set. We find that these intermittent re-balancers more than double the effect of aggregate shocks on the time variation in risk premia by forcing active traders to sell more shares in good times and buy more shares in bad times.

Suggested Citation

  • Yi-Li Chien & Harold L. Cole & Hanno Lustig, 2009. "Is the Volatility of the Market Price of Risk due to Intermittent Portfolio Re-balancing?," NBER Working Papers 15382, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:15382
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    Cited by:

    1. Carvalho, Carlos & Schwartzman, Felipe, 2015. "Selection and monetary non-neutrality in time-dependent pricing models," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 141-156.
    2. Chien, YiLi, 2015. "The Welfare Cost of Business Cycles with Heterogeneous Trading Technologies," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 97(1), pages 67-85.
    3. Giovanni Cespa & Xavier Vives, 2016. "High Frequency Trading and Fragility," CESifo Working Paper Series 6279, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. David, Joel M. & Simonovska, Ina, 2016. "Correlated beliefs, returns, and stock market volatility," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(S1), pages 58-77.
    5. Orazio P. Attanasio & Guglielmo Weber, 2010. "Consumption and Saving: Models of Intertemporal Allocation and Their Implications for Public Policy," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 48(3), pages 693-751, September.
    6. Adrian Buss & Bernard Dumas, 2015. "The Dynamic Properties of Financial-Market Equilibrium with Trading Fees," NBER Working Papers 21421, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Edison Yu, 2013. "Dynamic market participation and endogenous information aggregation," Working Papers 13-42, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    8. Campanale, Claudio & Fugazza, Carolina & Gomes, Francisco, 2015. "Life-cycle portfolio choice with liquid and illiquid financial assets," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 67-83.
    9. Chien, YiLi & Cole, Harold L. & Lustig, Hanno, 2014. "Implications of heterogeneity in preferences, beliefs and asset trading technologies for the macroeconomy," Working Papers 2014-14, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    10. Gao, Xiaodan & Hnatkovska, Viktoria & Marmer, Vadim, 2014. "Limited participation in international business cycle models: A formal evaluation," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 255-272.
    11. Yili Chien & Harold Cole & Hanno Lustig, 2016. "Implications of Heterogeneity in Preferences, Beliefs and Asset Trading Technologies in an Endowment Economy," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 20, pages 215-239, April.
    12. Philippe Bacchetta & Eric Van Wincoop, 2017. "Gradual Portfolio Adjustment: Implications for Global Equity Portfolios and Returns," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) 17.05, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP.
    13. repec:eee:jetheo:v:175:y:2018:i:c:p:491-517 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Finocchiaro, Daria, 2011. "Inattention, wealth inequality and equilibrium asset prices," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 146-155, March.
    15. Fernando Alvarez & Luigi Guiso & Francesco Lippi, 2012. "Durable Consumption and Asset Management with Transaction and Observation Costs," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(5), pages 2272-2300, August.
    16. Buss, Adrian & Dumas, Bernard J, 2015. "Trading Fees and Slow-Moving Capital," CEPR Discussion Papers 10737, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    17. Campanale, Claudio & Fugazza, Carolina & Gomes, Francisco J, 2015. "Life-Cycle Portfolio choice with Liquid and Illiquid Assets," CEPR Discussion Papers 10369, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    18. Jędrzej Białkowski & Ehud I. Ronn, 2017. "The Global Equity Premium Revisited: What Human Rights Imply for Assets’ Purchasing Power," Working Papers in Economics 17/19, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
    19. repec:eee:eecrev:v:103:y:2018:i:c:p:39-59 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Elías Albagli, 2013. "Investment Horizons and Asset Prices under Asymmetric Information," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 709, Central Bank of Chile.
    21. Kurt F. Lewis & Francis A. Longstaff & Lubomir Petrasek, 2017. "Asset Mispricing," NBER Working Papers 23231, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    22. Philippe Bacchetta, 2017. "Slow Moving Capital: Evidence from Global Equity Portfolios," 2017 Meeting Papers 1166, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates

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