IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Heterogeneous Price Setting Behavior and Monetary Non-neutrality: Some General Results

  • Felipe Schwartzman

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

  • Carlos Carvalho

    (Princeton University)

We analyze the effects of heterogeneity in price setting behavior in time-dependent sticky price and sticky information models characterized by quite general adjustment hazard functions. In a large class of models that includes the most commonly used price setting specifications, heterogeneity leads monetary shocks to have larger real effects than in one-sector economies with the same frequency of adjustments. Quantitatively, the effects of heterogeneity in models calibrated to match the recent empirical evidence on pricing behavior are large, even in the absence of strategic complementarity in price setting. We find that the degree of monetary non-neutrality in the calibrated heterogeneous economies can be as large as in an otherwise identical one-sector economy with roughly three times more nominal rigidity.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: https://www.economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2008/paper_1040.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2008 Meeting Papers with number 1040.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:red:sed008:1040
Contact details of provider: Postal: Society for Economic Dynamics Christian Zimmermann Economic Research Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis PO Box 442 St. Louis MO 63166-0442 USA
Fax: 1-314-444-8731
Web page: http://www.EconomicDynamics.org/society.htm
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Kevin D. Sheedy, 2007. "Inflation persistence when price stickiness differs between industries," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 3738, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  2. Ohanian, Lee E & Stockman, Alan C & Kilian, Lutz, 1995. "The Effects of Real and Monetary Shocks in a Business Cycle Model with Some Sticky Prices," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 27(4), pages 1209-34, November.
  3. Taylor, John B, 1979. "Staggered Wage Setting in a Macro Model," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(2), pages 108-13, May.
  4. Andrew Levin & Günter Coenen, 2005. "Identifying the Influences of Nominal and Real Rigidities in Aggregate Price-Setting Behavior," Computing in Economics and Finance 2005 66, Society for Computational Economics.
  5. Richard Mash, 2004. "Optimising Microfoundations for Inflation Persistence," Economics Series Working Papers 183, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  6. Dixon, Huw & Kara, Engin, 2005. "Persistence and nominal inertia in a generalized Taylor economy: how longer contracts dominate shorter contracts," Working Paper Series 0489, European Central Bank.
  7. Laurence Ball & David Romer, 1987. "Real Rigidities and the Non-Neutrality of Money," NBER Working Papers 2476, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Mark Bils & Peter J. Klenow & Oleksiy Kryvtsov, 2003. "Sticky prices and monetary policy shocks," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 2-9.
  9. Robert B. Barsky & Christopher L. House & Miles S. Kimball, 2007. "Sticky-Price Models and Durable Goods," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(3), pages 984-998, June.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:red:sed008:1040. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Christian Zimmermann)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.