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Responders Versus Nonresponders: A New Perspective on Heterogeneity

  • John Haltiwanger

    (The John Hopkins University)

This paper considers the implications of a particular type of heterogeneity--one which characterizes a large number of economic environments, but that has not received any systematic treatment in the literature. The authors refer to this heterogeneity as responders versus nonresponders. The paper begins by providing a general framework for the analysis of environments characterized by this heterogeneity and then shows how this framework can be used to help understand a wide variety of economic environments. Particular applications considered are, near rationality, network externalities, and models of reputation. Copyright 1991 by Royal Economic Society.

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File URL: http://www.econ.ucla.edu/workingpapers/wp436.pdf
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Paper provided by UCLA Department of Economics in its series UCLA Economics Working Papers with number 436.

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Date of creation: 01 Feb 1987
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Handle: RePEc:cla:uclawp:436
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.econ.ucla.edu/

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  1. John Haltiwanger & Michael Waldman, 1983. "Rational Expectations and the Limits of Rationality: An Analysis of Heterogeneity," UCLA Economics Working Papers 303, UCLA Department of Economics.
  2. Milgrom, Paul & Roberts, John, 1982. "Predation, reputation, and entry deterrence," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 280-312, August.
  3. Gary S. Becker & George J. Stigler, 1974. "Law Enforcement, Malfeasance, and Compensation of Enforcers," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages 1-18, January.
  4. Yellen, Janet L, 1984. "Efficiency Wage Models of Unemployment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 74(2), pages 200-205, May.
  5. David, Paul A, 1985. "Clio and the Economics of QWERTY," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 332-37, May.
  6. Radner, Roy, 1975. "Satisficing," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 253-262.
  7. Nelson, Richard R & Winter, Sidney G, 1973. "Toward an Evolutionary Theory of Economic Capabilities," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 63(2), pages 440-49, May.
  8. Katz, Michael L & Shapiro, Carl, 1986. "Technology Adoption in the Presence of Network Externalities," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(4), pages 822-41, August.
  9. Reinhard Selten, 1974. "The Chain Store Paradox," Working Papers 018, Bielefeld University, Center for Mathematical Economics.
  10. Lazear, Edward P, 1981. "Agency, Earnings Profiles, Productivity, and Hours Restrictions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(4), pages 606-20, September.
  11. Joseph Farrell & Garth Saloner, 1984. "Standardization, Compatibility and Innovation," Working papers 345, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  12. Conlisk, John, 1980. "Costly optimizers versus cheap imitators," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 1(3), pages 275-293, September.
  13. Shapiro, Carl & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1984. "Equilibrium Unemployment as a Worker Discipline Device," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 74(3), pages 433-44, June.
  14. Calvo, Guillermo A & Wellisz, Stanislaw, 1979. "Hierarchy, Ability, and Income Distribution," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages 991-1010, October.
  15. Russell, Thomas & Thaler, Richard, 1985. "The Relevance of Quasi Rationality in Competitive Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(5), pages 1071-82, December.
  16. Russell Cooper & John Andrew, 1985. "Coordinating Coordination Failures in Keynesian Models," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 745R, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University, revised Jul 1985.
  17. Akerlof, George A & Yellen, Janet L, 1985. "Can Small Deviations from Rationality Make Significant Differences to Economic Equilibria?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(4), pages 708-20, September.
  18. David Kreps & Robert Wilson, 1999. "Reputation and Imperfect Information," Levine's Working Paper Archive 238, David K. Levine.
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