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Optimal monetary policy in the generalized Taylor economy

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  • Kara, Engin

Abstract

In this paper, we use the generalized Taylor economy (GTE) framework to examine the optimal choice of inflation index. In this otherwise standard dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) model, there can be many sectors, each with a different contract length. In the GTE framework with an empirically relevant contract structure, a simple rule under which the interest rate responds to economy-wide inflation gives a welfare outcome nearly identical to the optimal policy. This finding suggests that it may not be necessary for a well-designed monetary policy to respond to sector-specific inflations.

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  • Kara, Engin, 2010. "Optimal monetary policy in the generalized Taylor economy," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(10), pages 2023-2037, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:34:y:2010:i:10:p:2023-2037
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    Cited by:

    1. Engin Kara, 2012. "Using Micro Data on Prices to Improve Business Cycle Models," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 12/632, School of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    2. Engin Kara, 2011. "Understanding and Modelling Reset Price Inflation," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 11/623, School of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    3. Huw David Dixon & Kun Tian, 2017. "What We can Learn About the Behaviour of Firms from the Average Monthly Frequency of Price-Changes: An Application to the UK CPI Data," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 79(6), pages 907-932, December.
    4. Mr. Giovanni Melina & Mr. Alessandro Cantelmo, 2017. "Sectoral Labor Mobility and Optimal Monetary Policy," IMF Working Papers 2017/040, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Huw Dixon & Hervé Le Bihan, 2012. "Generalised Taylor and Generalised Calvo Price and Wage Setting: Micro‐evidence with Macro Implications," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(560), pages 532-554, May.
    6. Dixon, Huw & Kara, Engin, 2011. "Contract length heterogeneity and the persistence of monetary shocks in a dynamic generalized Taylor economy," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 280-292, February.
    7. Kara Engin, 2011. "Micro-Data on Nominal Rigidity, Inflation Persistence and Optimal Monetary Policy," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 11(1), pages 1-19, July.
    8. Taylor, J.B., 2016. "The Staying Power of Staggered Wage and Price Setting Models in Macroeconomics," Handbook of Macroeconomics, in: J. B. Taylor & Harald Uhlig (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 0, pages 2009-2042, Elsevier.
    9. Huw Dixon & Engin Kara, 2011. "Taking Multi-Sector Dynamic General Equilibrium Models to the Data," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1125, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.
    10. Schnatz, Bernd, 2006. "Is reversion to PPP in euro exchange rates non-linear?," Working Paper Series 682, European Central Bank.
    11. Dixon, Huw & Franklin, Jeremy & Millard, Stephen, 2014. "Sectoral shocks and monetary policy in the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 499, Bank of England.
    12. Engin Kara & Yongmin Park, 2017. "Heterogeneity in Staggered Wage Bargaining and Unemployment Volatility Puzzle," CESifo Working Paper Series 6536, CESifo.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Inflation targeting Optimal monetary policy;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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