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The Corporate Saving Glut and the Current Account in Germany

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Listed:
  • Thorsten Klug
  • Eric Mayer
  • Tobias Schuler

    ()

Abstract

We investigate for Germany the positive correlation between the corporate savings glut in the non-financial corporate sector and the current account surplus from a capital account perspective. By employing sign restrictions our findings suggest that mostly labor market, world demand and financial friction shocks can account for the joint dynamics of excess corporate savings and the current account surplus. Private savings shocks, in contrast, cannot explain the correlation. We conclude that a corporate savings glut is a main driver of the current account surplus.

Suggested Citation

  • Thorsten Klug & Eric Mayer & Tobias Schuler, 2018. "The Corporate Saving Glut and the Current Account in Germany," ifo Working Paper Series 280, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ifowps:_280
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Current account; corporate savings; macro shocks;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • F32 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Current Account Adjustment; Short-term Capital Movements
    • F45 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Macroeconomic Issues of Monetary Unions

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