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Persistence and volatility of real exchange rates: the role of supply shocks revisited

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This paper re-examines the role of supply shocks for real exchange rate fluctuations. First, in a structural VAR analysis, we combine long run and sign restrictions to identify productivity and non-productivity supply shocks. Second, we show that a variance decomposition in the frequency domain generates quantitatively different results compared to the standard forecast error variance decomposition. In particular, productivity shocks are the most important driver of US real effective exchange rate fluctuations at low frequencies, while real demand shocks are more salient at high frequencies. We use the spectrum at frequency zero to structurally decompose the persistence of the real exchange rate. Supply shocks explain more than half of the persistence of the exchange rate.

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  • Britta Gehrke & Fang Yao, 2016. "Persistence and volatility of real exchange rates: the role of supply shocks revisited," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2016/02, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  • Handle: RePEc:nzb:nzbdps:2016/02
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    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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